The Chairman (1969)

AKA: The Most Dangerous Man In The World
Country: United Kingdom / United States
Director: J. Lee Thompson
Starring: Gregory Peck, Anne Heywood, Arthur Hill, Alan Dobie, Francisca Tu, Ori Levy, Zienia Merton, Conrad Yama, Keye Luke, Burt Kwouk, Eric Young
Music: Jerry Goldsmith
Based on the novel by Jay Richard Kennedy

Gregory Peck and director, J. Lee Thompson had worked together on a few very successful projects. Firstly was The Guns Of Navarone which was a critical and commercial success. Then there was the original Cape Fear (with Robert Mitchum). After that came MacKenna’s Gold which was quite successful in it’s day — however I think it’s a jumbled mess. But they had the runs on the board so I guess it’s no surprise that they’d team up again. The vehicle they chose was an overly plotted spy thriller called The Chairman.

The film begins with a jet whizzing through the sky on route to Hong Kong. On board is Dr. John Hathaway (Gregory Peck). A stewardess takes away his empty glass and out of sight, wraps it gently in a serviette and tucks it into her carry on luggage. Coincidentally, the actress playing the stewardess is Mai Ling, who you may remember as Mei-Lei, the stewardess in Goldfinger (just before Bond is introduced to Pussy Galore). Mai Ling also had an uncredited part in You Only Live Twice as one of the ‘bath girls’. The film then cuts away to a top secret US research facility and two men from opposing sides of the cold war. They are Russian General Alexander Shertov (Ori Levy) and American General Shelby (Arthur Hill). They are jointly overseeing and operation codenamed Minotaur. The operation has in fact already started and the agent involved is Hathaway. Implanted into his head (ouch), Hathaway has a tiny transmitter, and during a break in the aircraft’s bathroom he relays his report.

The film then flashes back to some time earlier – we are never really given a time frame. Hathaway is a science professor in London who receives a letter from an old colleague, Professor Soong Li, who has been stationed in China for the last ten years. The letter says that Hathaway will not be able to visit him anymore. Since Hathaway had never visited his colleague, and didn’t have plans to do so in the near future, the communiqué seemed rather suspicious. Hathaway relays his suspicions to the authorities.

But once upon a time, before he was a Nobel Prize winning science professor, Hathaway was an OSS agent, and his message to the authorities has him called in front of General Shelby. Shelby is an old school hard-ass, and to prove it, he is missing an eye – and he has a scar to go with it which indicates he lost it in combat. Now he wears glasses with one darkened lens covering the missing eye. I guess it’s a modern take on the eye patch. Anyway, Shelby’s hard and doesn’t like Hathaway, but he has his orders from higher up, so he shows Hathaway some top secret footage. The first scenes show a wheat field in a hot humid jungle location in China. Next is footage shot in Tibet of a pineapple plantation on a cold icy mountain. It is surmised that the Chinese have genetically modified the crops so that climate has little or no effect on what is grown and where. Now this may not seem like your average threat from the Red Chinese, but once the third world countries hear about this miracle ‘enzyme’, they will gladly kow-tow to the Chinese leaving America and the USSR discarded in their wake. Hathaway’s mission is to go to China a retrieve a sample of the enzyme.

Now this is year the film gets a little bit convoluted. Naturally, back in 1969, an American could not just go to China. China was very much closed off to the rest of the world. It was very hard for a westerner to get a visa. But Hathaway can go to Hong Kong, which is under British rule. Once there he receives a phone call in his hotel room. He is to meet the mysterious caller — Mr Yin (Eric Young) — at a nightclub, which is half brothel, half casino. At this point it is worth noting if you are watching the US 20th Century Fox DVD version (and at this time it’s not available in too many other formats) then you will have the opportunity to watch alternative – or international versions of some of the scenes in Hong Kong. The US version seems to be heavily censored, whereas the international version features more nudity. Now I feel this is important — not because I am a randy old pervert — but because it presents an interesting contrast against the strict and possibly oppressive regime in China at that time, with Hong Kong which, although is a Chinese community, is under western (British) control. So the West is depicted as being rather decadent.

But back to the story. Hathaway meets a Chinese official named Yin who grants Hathaway a visa to China. Now you’re probably thinking, why would the Chinese grant Hathaway a visa. He is no doubt a spy — Why? But as previously mentioned Hathaway is also a Nobel Prize winning scientist and the Chinese haven’t worked all the bugs out of their enzyme project. So they want Hathaway in China for his knowledge. So the Chinese want Hathaway in China — the Americans and the Russians want Hathaway in China. It appears that everybody wants Hathaway in China except Hathaway.

Needless to say Hathaway goes to China and is greeted as almost a celebrity. Hundreds of people (possibly thousands) greet him at the airport — all of them waving red flags, or placards with images of Mao, or even little red books. Soon after, Hathaway is spirited off to meet Mao himself where — over a game of Ping pong — they discuss their differing opinions on humanity and the global implications and distribution of the enzyme.

The Chairman can be looked at in three ways. The first is as a travelogue and snapshot of the times (although much of the Asian footage was shot in Taiwan). On this level the film is first rate. As a time capsule and a throwback to the late sixties this film is quite an eye opener. Added to that, most spy films at the time featured the Russians as the enemy. It is quite unusual to see the Red Chinese as a villain (villain may not be the right word in this instant – but you know what I mean!).

Next if you are a spy film nut (like yours truly), then The Chairman serves up a great smorgasbord of spy talent. Starting with Gregory Peck — let’s face it, Peck was pretty good whatever genre he tackled, but he put in a few good performances in spy films. I particularly like Arabesque. I have already mentioned Mai Ling, but then there is Keye Luke as Professor Soong Li. Luke had a very long career, coming to prominence as Number One son in early Charlie Chan adventures, but his espionage credentials are solid appearing in I Spy, The FBI, Hawaii Five-O, and The Amsterdam Kill. Someone with even more strings to his bow, as far as espionage shows go is Burt Kwouk — who to me will always be Cato from Peter Sellers Pink panther films, but her appeared in The Saint, the Avengers, Jason King, Callan and the list goes on. Another character actor appearing as Yin is Eric Young — now if you saw Young you may not recognise him, but you would recognise his voice. He too, was a jobbing actor also appearing in The Saint, Jason King, Strange Report and a few Fu Manchu films.

The third way you can look at The Chairman is solely as a spy thriller, and this is where the film really lets itself down. As a positive it has an interesting and possibly even modern approach to surveillance — some aspects of this film are almost like Patriot Games and Peacemaker, with the immediate access to intel and the department heads are able to make their decisions based on that information. But the truth be told this film is very discerningly paced (a polite way of saying slow, with very little action) for the first three quarters of its running time. The last twenty minutes though, is really quite good, and manages to build up some tension and excitement, but I fear most viewers will have either turned off or have lost interest in the story by this stage.

But as you may have gathered, I didn’t think this film was too bad, but then I’m the type who thrives on this sort of thing. If you aren’t a spy film junky, then you may find this film clunky.

The Chairman (1969)

The Chairman (1969)

AKA: The Most Dangerous Man In The World
Country: United Kingdom / United States
Director: J. Lee Thompson
Starring: Gregory Peck, Anne Heywood, Arthur Hill, Alan Dobie, Francisca Tu, Ori Levy, Zienia Merton, Conrad Yama, Keye Luke, Burt Kwouk, Eric Young
Music: Jerry Goldsmith
Based on the novel by Jay Richard Kennedy

Gregory Peck and director, J. Lee Thompson had worked together on a few very successful projects. Firstly was The Guns Of Navarone which was a critical and commercial success. Then there was the original Cape Fear (with Robert Mitchum). After that came MacKenna’s Gold which was quite successful in it’s day — however I think it’s a jumbled mess. But they had the runs on the board so I guess it’s no surprise that they’d team up again. The vehicle they chose was an overly plotted spy thriller called The Chairman.

The film begins with a jet whizzing through the sky on route to Hong Kong. On board is Dr. John Hathaway (Gregory Peck). A stewardess takes away his empty glass and out of sight, wraps it gently in a serviette and tucks it into her carry on luggage. Coincidentally, the actress playing the stewardess is Mai Ling, who you may remember as Mei-Lei, the stewardess in Goldfinger (just before Bond is introduced to Pussy Galore). Mai Ling also had an uncredited part in You Only Live Twice as one of the ‘bath girls’. The film then cuts away to a top secret US research facility and two men from opposing sides of the cold war. They are Russian General Alexander Shertov (Ori Levy) and American General Shelby (Arthur Hill). They are jointly overseeing and operation codenamed Minotaur. The operation has in fact already started and the agent involved is Hathaway. Implanted into his head (ouch), Hathaway has a tiny transmitter, and during a break in the aircraft’s bathroom he relays his report.

The film then flashes back to some time earlier – we are never really given a time frame. Hathaway is a science professor in London who receives a letter from an old colleague, Professor Soong Li, who has been stationed in China for the last ten years. The letter says that Hathaway will not be able to visit him anymore. Since Hathaway had never visited his colleague, and didn’t have plans to do so in the near future, the communiqué seemed rather suspicious. Hathaway relays his suspicions to the authorities.

But once upon a time, before he was a Nobel Prize winning science professor, Hathaway was an OSS agent, and his message to the authorities has him called in front of General Shelby. Shelby is an old school hard-ass, and to prove it, he is missing an eye – and he has a scar to go with it which indicates he lost it in combat. Now he wears glasses with one darkened lens covering the missing eye. I guess it’s a modern take on the eye patch. Anyway, Shelby’s hard and doesn’t like Hathaway, but he has his orders from higher up, so he shows Hathaway some top secret footage. The first scenes show a wheat field in a hot humid jungle location in China. Next is footage shot in Tibet of a pineapple plantation on a cold icy mountain. It is surmised that the Chinese have genetically modified the crops so that climate has little or no effect on what is grown and where. Now this may not seem like your average threat from the Red Chinese, but once the third world countries hear about this miracle ‘enzyme’, they will gladly kow-tow to the Chinese leaving America and the USSR discarded in their wake. Hathaway’s mission is to go to China a retrieve a sample of the enzyme.

Now this is year the film gets a little bit convoluted. Naturally, back in 1969, an American could not just go to China. China was very much closed off to the rest of the world. It was very hard for a westerner to get a visa. But Hathaway can go to Hong Kong, which is under British rule. Once there he receives a phone call in his hotel room. He is to meet the mysterious caller — Mr Yin (Eric Young) — at a nightclub, which is half brothel, half casino. At this point it is worth noting if you are watching the US 20th Century Fox DVD version (and at this time it’s not available in too many other formats) then you will have the opportunity to watch alternative – or international versions of some of the scenes in Hong Kong. The US version seems to be heavily censored, whereas the international version features more nudity. Now I feel this is important — not because I am a randy old pervert — but because it presents an interesting contrast against the strict and possibly oppressive regime in China at that time, with Hong Kong which, although is a Chinese community, is under western (British) control. So the West is depicted as being rather decadent.

But back to the story. Hathaway meets a Chinese official named Yin who grants Hathaway a visa to China. Now you’re probably thinking, why would the Chinese grant Hathaway a visa. He is no doubt a spy — Why? But as previously mentioned Hathaway is also a Nobel Prize winning scientist and the Chinese haven’t worked all the bugs out of their enzyme project. So they want Hathaway in China for his knowledge. So the Chinese want Hathaway in China — the Americans and the Russians want Hathaway in China. It appears that everybody wants Hathaway in China except Hathaway.

Needless to say Hathaway goes to China and is greeted as almost a celebrity. Hundreds of people (possibly thousands) greet him at the airport — all of them waving red flags, or placards with images of Mao, or even little red books. Soon after, Hathaway is spirited off to meet Mao himself where — over a game of Ping pong — they discuss their differing opinions on humanity and the global implications and distribution of the enzyme.

The Chairman can be looked at in three ways. The first is as a travelogue and snapshot of the times (although much of the Asian footage was shot in Taiwan). On this level the film is first rate. As a time capsule and a throwback to the late sixties this film is quite an eye opener. Added to that, most spy films at the time featured the Russians as the enemy. It is quite unusual to see the Red Chinese as a villain (villain may not be the right word in this instant – but you know what I mean!).

Next if you are a spy film nut (like yours truly), then The Chairman serves up a great smorgasbord of spy talent. Starting with Gregory Peck — let’s face it, Peck was pretty good whatever genre he tackled, but he put in a few good performances in spy films. I particularly like Arabesque. I have already mentioned Mai Ling, but then there is Keye Luke as Professor Soong Li. Luke had a very long career, coming to prominence as Number One son in early Charlie Chan adventures, but his espionage credentials are solid appearing in I Spy, The FBI, Hawaii Five-O, and The Amsterdam Kill. Someone with even more strings to his bow, as far as espionage shows go is Burt Kwouk — who to me will always be Cato from Peter Sellers Pink panther films, but her appeared in The Saint, the Avengers, Jason King, Callan and the list goes on. Another character actor appearing as Yin is Eric Young — now if you saw Young you may not recognise him, but you would recognise his voice. He too, was a jobbing actor also appearing in The Saint, Jason King, Strange Report and a few Fu Manchu films.

The third way you can look at The Chairman is solely as a spy thriller, and this is where the film really lets itself down. As a positive it has an interesting and possibly even modern approach to surveillance — some aspects of this film are almost like Patriot Games and Peacemaker, with the immediate access to intel and the department heads are able to make their decisions based on that information. But the truth be told this film is very discerningly paced (a polite way of saying slow, with very little action) for the first three quarters of its running time. The last twenty minutes though, is really quite good, and manages to build up some tension and excitement, but I fear most viewers will have either turned off or have lost interest in the story by this stage.

But as you may have gathered, I didn’t think this film was too bad, but then I’m the type who thrives on this sort of thing. If you aren’t a spy film junky, then you may find this film clunky.

The Chairman (1969)

Hercules Against the Barbarians

Film GenericAs with most of the Peplum films that are out there, there appears to be many versions of this film, varying in running time from about 90 minutes to 120 minutes. As well as differing running times, the films hero seems to change from either Hercules or Masciste, the son of Hercules. But that shouldn’t matter too much. The version I am reviewing here is the shortened American version, Hercules Against The Barbarians from, you guessed it, the Mill Creek Warriors 50 Movie Pack.

In many ways this is a follow up to Hercules Against The Mongols. Both films feature Mark Forest as Hercules (or Maciste), Ken Clark, and José Greci; and they are directed by Domenico Paolella. Unfortunately this film isn’t as entertaining than it’s ‘unofficial’ prequel.

In Hercules Against The Mongols, Ken Clark played one of Genghis Khan’s sons (Sayan), but this time he plays Kubilai. But in both films he had to sport a silly hairpiece and a droopy moustache.

The movie starts off with Genghis Khan and his Mongol army invading Poland. Actually we don’t see the invasion, only lots of Mongols, waving spears of horseback. The narrator tells us the Mongols have suffered their first defeat. We are also told that Hercules has fought alongside the Polish, like a ‘tornado’. And when we finally clap eyes on Hercules, he is being thanked, slapped on the back and sent on his way. The opening seems like a bit of a ripoff to me. We hear of a great battle but don’t see it.

Hercules is heading back to Arminia (Jose Greci), his fiancé, but before he arrives, strange things are happening in her village. Firstly a woman, Arias (Gloria Milland) is being chased by an angry mob. They accuse her of being a witch and want to burn her at the stake. She finds refuge in Arminia and her father’s cottage. However, he protection doesn’t last too long, as a band of Mongols arrive and kidnap Arminia, and kill her father. Arias is left arrive, and blamed for the atrocity. The mob quickly pick up their flaming torches once more and tie Arias to a stake. But just before going up in flames, she is rescued once more, this time by Hercules.

It is determined that the Mongols have taken Arminia to the city of Tornapol, where she is being held captive by Genghis Khan (Roldano Lupi). Naturally enough, Hercules and his new lady friend, Arias, set off in a bid to rescue Arminia.

The real villain in this movie is Kubilai (Ken Clark). Kubilai is a vicious piece of work, prepared to kill anyone who hinders his ascension to power, including his father and his brother. His malevolence is shown when he stabs one of his lovers in the heart after she has learnt too much about Kubilai’s plans.

At times, Hercules Against The Barbarians veers into Tarzan territory. Hercules battles various rubber creatures during his travels including a giant python, and a crocodile. Forest makes an admirable attempt at making the croc fight seem real, but cannot overcome the glaringly fake rubber reptile.

For me, Hercules Against The Barbarians is a weak entry in the Sword and Sandal series. Forest is not my favourite Hercules. He takes the role far too seriously and always looks to be in pain. At best the Hercules films are the antecedents of the swashbuckling films of the thirties and the forties. Errol Flynn and Tyrone Power always had a cheeky smile. Not so Forest. He is workman like in his approach.

On top of that this movie is fairly slowed paced and drags between action sequences. There is one sequence that is worth mentioning though. It is in the palace of Genghis Khan, and we are treated to an array of ‘regal’ entertainment, including oriental dancers spinning plates on sticks, and acrobats spinning and tumbling over giant flags as they are swirled around the room. The entertainment culminates with Hercules and one of Genghis Khan’s warriors fighting to the death in a gauntlet of (rubber tipped) spears.

Hercules Against the Barbarians

Fire Monster Against the Son of Hercules

Film GenericThe version of Fire Monsters Against the Son of Hercules that I viewed seems to be an American repackaging of another English version of the film. It features a toe-tapping theme song, “The Mighty Sons Of Hercules” which appears to have been tacked onto a few Sons Of Hercules Adventures – for example Mole Men Against The Son Of Hercules starring Mark Forest. In this film Reg Lewis plays Maciste, but the very weird thing is that whenever he says his name, he has been re-dubbed (by another voice that sounds nothing like the original dub). He says “My name is MAXIS – SON OF HERCULES

This film is a bit different to many of the other Hercules, or Sons Of Hercules films. It doesn’t take place in ancient Greece or Italy. It takes place in the Ice Age. Which brings us to a very interesting question. How could the Son Of Hercules being wandering around the planet, when his father wasn’t born till several thousand years later? Maybe it’s best that we ignore that.

The films opens with the Sun Tribe venturing out of the ice, trying to find a new home where they can set up camp. These are the good guys. You can tell, because they wear white fur skins as clothing. Amongst the Sun Tribe are Idar (Luciano Marin) and Fuwan (Andrea Aureli). They are set to be married. As they stroll along the foreshore of a lake, a giant rubber water dragon attacks them. It looks like it is curtains for our young lovers, but from a cliff top over-looking the lake, up jumps Maxis (Reg Lewis). Lewis, who is suitably beefy for the role, looks like a blonde Elvis on steroids. His slicked back, rockabilly haircut seems a little bit out of place during the Ice Age, but that is just another thing that it is best that we ignore. Maxis tosses a spear at the dragon which hits it in the eye. The dragon dies and Maxis walks off, having completed his good deed for the day.

Later, Idar and Fuwan are married. As the ceremony finishes, the Sun Tribe’s camp is attacked by the Moon Tribe. You can tell the Moon Tribe is bad because they wear black fur skins. The Moon Tribe kill most of the men, and take the women prisoner. They march the women back to their camp, which is hidden in a cave.

Idar is now leader of the surviving Sun people, and naturally wants Fuwan (and the other girls) back. He sends out search parties for Maxis, who is undoubtedly wandering around in a forest nearby awaiting some kind of calamity, where his strength and services will be required. He responds to the call, and tracks the Moon Tribe to the underground lair.

Inside the cave, Maxis meets and teams up with Moa (Margaret Lee), and that folks is possibly the main reason to watch this film. There is something special about watching Margaret Lee scantily clad in animal skins.

Despite the title, Maxis doesn’t really have to battle a giant Fire Monster in this film. There are two dragons and a few snake like water monsters, but this film isn’t really a rubber monster flick. It is about the two warring tribes.

There are some decent set pieces throughout the film, mostly fights with bloody great clubs, and of course, Maxis gets to throw around a few paper mache rocks and trees. The cheesiest moment happens when Maxis and Moa have been captured by the Moon Tribe and are buried up to their neck in sand. How the couple escape form this dire predicament is laughable.

Fire Monsters Against the Son of Hercules is pretty average. If it didn’t feature Margaret Lee, I would have switched off half way. Reg Lewis is wooden and very low-key as the hero. As a screen presence, I’d say he was over shadowed by Luciano Marin as Idar. And I am not too convinced about the Stone Age backdrop to this film either. I miss seeing the grand palaces with their evil Kings and Queens, the staple of so many peplum films. All in all, I think this film is a bit of a failure.

Fire Monster Against the Son of Hercules

Sinbad the Sailor

Film GenericAs this Sinbad movie predates Harryhausen’s 7th Voyage Of Sinbad by about ten years, this film doesn’t feature any rubber monsters or mythical creatures. But that isn’t necessarily a bad thing. It simply means this film relies on old fashioned adventure and swashbuckling.

The film opens around a campfire, and Sinbad (Douglas Fairbanks Jnr) is retelling the tales from his previous seven voyages, but the audience is bored. They have all heard his fantastical stories before. And furthermore, they didn’t believe him, the first time he told them. In an earnest attempt to make believers of the men gathered around Sinbad begins retelling the tale of his latest (the 8th) voyage.

Sinbad’s tale begins with a ship floundering off the shore during a violent thunderstorm. Sinbad and his buddy, Abbu (George Tobias), swim out to the ship and take control. On board, the crew is all dead. The water bag has been poisoned. Also on board, Sinbad discovers a map to the fabled land of Derriobah where Alexander The Great is said to have hidden his treasure. Adding to the mystery, in the captain’s quarters, a stained glass window has the same image as an amulet that Sinbad wears around his neck. It is an amulet that he has had since birth.

The legend goes that the King of Derriobah feared that pirates would kidnap his son in an effort to have him reveal the whereabouts of the treasure. So he sent his son off to be brought up in a far away land – away from brigands and pirate treasure seekers. Once the young Prince had grown to manhood, a ship was sent out to find him and bring him back home.

Now the ship has been found, many people believe it will lead them to Derriobah, including Sinbad (who may or may not be the Prince). But as he makes port to take on a crew, the map disappears, and with it, his guide to riches untold of.

Adding to the adventure is Shireen (Maureen O’Hara). Now that Sinbad has lost the map, he believes Shireen is his link to Derriobah. But unfortunately for Sinbad, she has teamed up with the cutthroat Amir of Daipur (Anthony Quinn) in their own quest to find the treasure. Regardless, Sinbad sets sail with his own crew of miscreants in a race to find the lost land and the riches of Alexander The Great.

This film is a nice little adventure tale, but it isn’t too frenetically paced. The running, jumping and swinging style of swashbuckling doesn’t really kick in till the forty minute mark. That’s not to say that the film is boring. It isn’t, but for the first third it concentrates on it’s characters rather than action set pieces. As far as swashbucklers go, this film isn’t bad, but it is a step down from the type of film that Errol Flynn or Tyrone Power had done previously.

Sinbad the Sailor

Satanik

Film GenericBecause of the marketing of this movie, a masked girl in a black or red catsuit, Satanik is often compared to Danger: Diabolik. It’s an unfair comparison because they are totally different styles of film. Satanik is in fact a variation on the Jekyll and Hyde story, and has very little to do with masked heroes or villains. Like Diabolik, there is a Satanik comic book, but even then some extreme liberties have been taken with the character. There is a lot of history to the Satanik character, more than I can list here (and I am far from an expert on this), but believe it or not, this film belongs to the same family as the Turkish Kilink fims or the Italian Kriminal films, rather than Danger:Diabolik.

The film opens with Marnie Bannister (Magda Konopka) walking the street on a dark miserable night. She hails a taxi. Inside the taxi we finally get to see her face. It is horribly disfigured, and we wonder what had happened to her. She is in a hurry and gives her instruction to the taxi driver. She is taken to a Doctor. When she enters the room, we expected him to be shocked at her appearance, but not so. That is just the way she looks. She hasn’t been beaten up or involved in an accident (not recently anyway…we are never given a reason for her disfigurement)…she has lived with her scars for quite some time now. And this doctor is not your standard medical doctor. He is in fact a research scientist and Bannister is his research assistant.

The doctor has been working on youth serum and has had a minor breakthrough. He tried his latest formula on an old decrepit dog and it had staggering effects. The dog reverted back to being a puppy. It appears that the Doctor’s research has been successful, except for one small side effect. The dog is now extremely aggressive. It has become a vicious beast.

Bannister is so impressed with the breakthrough that she immediately volunteers to be the first human guinea pig. The Doctor advises against it. Who knows how it would affect humans. He wants to do more research. This isn’t good enough for Bannister. She has been living with the disfigurement for a long time now, and cannot wait any longer.

Bannister kills the doctor and takes the formula. She begins to convulse and passes out. But when she awakes, she is no longer the ugly, disfigured hag, but a gorgeous, super-model type. Now she is a killer on the run. None-the-less, a beautiful one.

This introduces us to Inspector Trent (Julio Pena), the Scotland Yard detective who is working on the case. It doesn’t seem to matter what country Trent is in, he is given any of that jurisdiction guff. He is allowed to investigate wherever he likes? Trent is a workman like detective. He follows his investigation where it leads, but even at the end, doesn’t truly understand that this case is different; that something (almost) supernatural is happening.

Satanik is not a bad bit of Eurosleaze, but I think it could have been more. It is quite slow in parts and all supporting characters are drawn pretty thin. But then again, the enjoyment from this film comes from watching Bannister move from one problem to the next and how she resolves each of the situations. We don’t really need to dwell on her co-stars. This is where the pacing problems do come into it though. Often we can see what is going to happen, and we want the film-makers to get on with it.

On the plus side, the film has a jet-setting late sixties feel to it. There are playboys in bars, performance art, casinos, go-go dancing, and a swinging sixties soundtrack.

If you enjoy sixties cinema, you may enjoy Satanik. Others may find it a bit slow, and the violence and horror aspects of the story too tame by today’s standards.

Satanik