Red Hill Brewery: Scotch Ale

Brewery: Red Hill Brewery
Style: Scotch Ale
Alc / Vol: 5.8%
Country: Australia

88 Shoreham Road, Red Hill South, VIC 3939
www.redhillbrewery.com.au

Not so very long ago in Australian history, on the day that the Federal Government announced it’s yearly budget, the newspaper headlines would scream ‘Beer and Cigarette prices to rise!’ You see, that was the most important thing, regardless of whatever reforms were being introduced. To the average Australian what mattered most was the cost of booze and cigarettes. Then in the 1980s, under the Hawke Government, an escalating tax was introduced which increases excise rates every February and August. This took the pressure off the Government on Budget night, and essentially forced manufacturers to either put up their prices every six months, or reduce the amount of alcohol and tobacco in their products.

Initially the impact of this legislation was minimal, but now twenty-plus years down the track it has major flow on effects to the brewing industry. Take for example, Victoria Bitter (or ‘VB’ as it is known), which is Australia’s largest selling beer. In fact, those of you who have watched the DVD features on Quentin Tarrantino’s Inglourious Basterds may have noticed a short amusing feature where ‘Rugged’ Rod Taylor extols the virtues of VB. Four years ago, VB had an alcohol content of 4.9 percent; today it has been reduced to 4.6 percent, verging on the threshold of becoming a mid-strength beer.

If there is a slight irony to this, it is that former Prime Minister, Bob Hawke, whose Government implemented this excise, was a previously a world record holder for downing a yard glass. From Wikipedia:

His academic achievements were complemented by setting a new world speed record for beer drinking: a yard glass (approximately 3 imperial pints or 1.7 litres) in eleven seconds. In his memoirs, Hawke suggested that this single feat may have contributed to his political success more than any other, by endearing him to a voting population with a strong beer culture.

Now, why I bring up all this history, is that these tax excises can be carried by the larger brewers, such as CUB (Foster’s Brewing Group), but is crippling to the majority of micro-brewers around the country. Today I am looking at the Scotch Ale produced by Red Hill Brewery, which is a micro brewery located on the Mornington Peninsula. Scotch Ales, to me, have always been fighting beers. Usually they are strong (around 8.5% Alc/Vol), and they’re the beer that tips you over the edge for the evening, and quite often lands you in trouble.

But Red Hill Brewery’s Scotch Ale isn’t quite like that. At 5.8% it isn’t as strong as a traditional Scotch Ale, and taste wise it hasn’t quite got the kick in the tail that is normally associated with a robust Scotch. Now this is an assumption on my part, but I am pretty sure that this lower alcohol content and strength of character in the taste, comes down to keeping the price competitive for the average consumer. As a comparison, one of Australia’s other Scotch Ales, made by Grand Ridge is around 8.5% Alc/Vol, but, and here’s the real kicker, a six-pack retails for around AU$36.00. Considering that you can pick up a slab (that’s ‘Case’ for American readers) of Heineken or Budweiser for AU$40-45, you can see it is a hefty price tag to carry. A slab – 24 beers – of Grand Ridge Scotch Ale retails for around AU$136.00. You have to be a very keen drinker to shell out for that. Red Hill’s Scotch Ale retails for a competitive AU$20.00 for a six-pack.

So Red Hill’s Scotch Ale is not an angry beer, unlike many of its ilk, but depending on your palate, that may not be such a bad thing. The label describes the beer as such:

The colour of burnished copper, strong with a caramely sweetness. Balanced with our own goldings and Williamette fresh hop flowers.

Tasting it, the first thing that hit me was the sweetness and the fruit flavours, almost like cherries, and then, rather than caramel, a dark chocolate flavour finishes off. This beer is not burnt or smokey like a stout; it’s more like a ‘Rocky Road’ in a bottle (without the marshmallow).

Being a dark and robust beer, I would have initially suggested that this is a beer that would go exceptionally well red meat (particularly on a cold, dark miserable night), but the sweetness make me think it could be pushed a bit further. It may make a fine companion for roast pork – especially if you’re decadent enough to baste the pork in maple syrup and coca-cola (I know – dentists would not approve). Or alternately, next time, rather than a dessert wine, maybe try a Red Hill Scotch Ale; then chased down with an aged Tawny or a long black (for those who are driving).

All in all, Red Hill Brewery’s Scotch Ale is a fine and versatile beer. I don’t know is it is truly a ‘Scotch’; after all I didn’t feel like picking a fight with complete strangers after downing a few, but it is rich and full bodied, and coupled with the right food, I am sure it could take you to wonderful places.

The Red Hill micro brewery opened in 2004, and specialises in producing three main beers, being their Golden Ale, a Wheat Beer, and the Scotch Ale. They also produce a selection of seasonal beers, such as their Christmas Ale, Imperial Stout, Belgian Blonde, Bohemian Pilsner, and Weizenbock. If you’re in that part of the world, (Down Under, and in Melbourne) they are well worth a visit.

Red Hill Brewery: Scotch Ale

Mission Impossible: Recovery (1967)

Country: United States
Director: Robert Totten
Starring: Peter Graves, Martin Landau, Barbara Bain, Greg Morris, Peter Lupus, Bradford Dillman, Emile Genst, Peter Coe, Peter Hellmann
Theme: Lalo Schifrin
Music: Jerry Fielding

Recovery is the last episode from Season Two of Mission: Impossible and it features Bradford Dillman as a brilliant American scientist who has defected and is now working on the other side of the Iron Curtain. Even though the character is painfully underwritten, Dillman excels at characters like this…essentially slimy bureaucrats. My favourite performance by Dillman is as Sergeant McKay in the third Dirty Harry film The Enforcer (here’s a seven pointed suppository!), but he also appeared in other espionage related material like The Man From UNCLE movie, The Helicopter Spies.

The episode starts with Jim Phelps (Peter Graves) receiving his mission briefing, this time in a carpark attendant’s booth. Here he learns that a SAC B52 has crashed behind the Iron Curtain, but the fail-safe mechanism has failed to explode and destroy all the top-secret information on board. The wreckage is taken to a scientific institute for examination – and the possible extraction of the top-secret information. The man behind the extraction is an ex-US scientist named Shipherd (Bradford Dillman). Jim’s mission (should he choose to accept it) is to retrieve the Fail Safe mechanism and bring Shipherd back to the United States.

The first part of the scheme involves Rollin Hand (Martin Landau) and Cinnamon Carter (Barbara Bain), posing as man and wife – Charles and Janet Langley – at an Embassy party in the un-named Iron Curtain country. At the party, the Langley’s meet Shipherd briefly. The meeting seems short and particularly unremarkable – except Rollin has sewn some seeds about his employment history, which of course become more relevant as the story goes on.

Jim Phelps has multiple roles to play in this role. The first is as the pilot of the B52 that went down. As ‘Hayes’, with dark, dyed hair, Jim allows himself to be captured, knowing full well that Shipherd will interrogate him, hoping to learn some of the secrets of the Fail Safe system. Jim (as Hayes), under interrogation says that the only people who can disarm the Fail Safe mechanism are the boffins at Duluth, who created the device.

Coincidentally, earlier, Rollin (as Langley) suggested to Shipherd that he worked on top-secret projects in Duluth. Shipherd makes the connection and invites Langley, as a guest, to visit the Institute.

Jim’s second role in this episode is as a service technician – with trademark silver hair this time – who is called in the repair a paper shredder at the Institute – a paper shredder that has been disabled by Barney Collier (Greg Morris). Meanwhile Shipherd has kidnapped Cinnamon (posing as Langley’s wife) and uses her to blackmail Rollin into opening the safe.

The character of Shipherd is somewhat clumsily written. He claims to have defected because he is sick of his scientific research being used for militaristic ends, but yet his new employers seem to be utilising his talents for the same purpose. Furthermore, he proves to be a rather unscrupulous character when he is prepared to ‘blow-up’ Cinnamon in order to crack the Fail-Safe. So any political posturing by the character is quickly made redundant by the plot contrivances. It’s here, where Dillman’s almost patented ‘slimy bureaucrat’ schtick actually works for the story. As it stands, Recovery is not one of the great Mission: Impossible episodes, but it is serviceable and very enjoyable – and this is primarily to do with Dillman who proves to be an entertaining foe for the IMF team.

Mission Impossible: Recovery (1967)

Fallback

As I mentioned the other day, I’ll be a bit light on for posts over the next week or two, but there is still great spy blogging happening. Markus Wolf at The Stasi has just reviewed Fallback by Peter Niesewand.

It seems Mr. Wolf didn’t like the twist halfway through the story – but forgive me, maybe it’s my fondness for trash – but the twist to me sounds fantastic…it reads like the literary equivalent of a Eurospy film.

Here’s a snippet.

… instead the author chooses [to] have the boss of the agency terminate the young super agent and then transplant the brain from the old man into his head, thus creating the ultimate agent. I honestly never saw that coming, and this made me sceptical for the rest of the book. I love escapism – that is the whole point of cold war fiction, but it has to be credible escapism. For instance, I thought The Power by James Mills about telepathy was one of the worst books I have ever read, yet Larry Collins Maze, which set along the same lines was quite good he managed to credibly explain the science coupled with good character development and a decent plot. In one fell swoop, the author has turned a very good cold war spy book that had all the right ingredients into something that is frankly a bit stupid.

Sounds great doesn’t it? To read the whole review click here.

An interesting tidbit about the author – from the Academic Dictionary and Encyclopedia:

Niesewand is credited with originating terrorist Ilich Ramírez Sánchez’s ‘Jackal’ alias: “The nickname the Guardian reporter Peter Niesewand had inspired by mentioning the Forsyth thriller found along with the arms cache in Angela Otaola’s bedsit was a perfect fit. Derogatory yet with just a hint of admiration for the cunning of the canine sometimes known as “the lion’s provider”

Fallback

Field Reports: 1

After months of delays, I am finally moving house, and will be off air for a short while (not too long I hope). But for spy fans, there is still many great resources on the net.

• There’s a nice review from Todd at 4DK of the Eurospy flick Scorpions and Miniskirts (AKA: Death on a Rainy Afternoon).

• Jeremy Duns, author of Free Country, is interviewed at the Harrogate festival by the website Unbound, and you can read that here. The audio of the interview is here.

• The Lightning Bug’s Lair celebrates its second anniversary this month. I thought it was worth revisiting They Call Her Cleopatra Wong

• If ‘ROCK’ is your thing, then here’s Rory Gallagher playing Philby and Secret Agent

• Tanner at the Double-O-Section reviews Network’s DVD release of The Corridor People

• Jason at Spyvibe takes a look at the Satire / Surrealism in the UK which influenced The Corridor People.

• James Phelan’s fifth Lachlan Fox book Red Ice is out now.

• Markus Wolf from The Stasi Kalls up the Ku Klux Klan and asks them about their activities during the Cold War.

• Johny Malone hosts the Flickr Espionage & Action Art Gallery which has a fantastic selection of book covers and poster art.

• From the excellent Spy Guys & Gals website comes a fascinating overview of The Coxeman series of spy books.

• And finally, for those who haven’t been across yet, P2K Red is my companion website where I write about all those things that aren’t SPY. Among the many posts, I have recently looked at Dean Koontz’s Velocity, the Australian cannibal epic Van Diemen’s Land and Jackie Chan’s take on Mr. Miyagi in The Karate Kid.

Field Reports: 1

Velocity

Author: Dean Koontz
Published: 2005

Velocity is the first Dean Koontz novel that I have read, primarily because he writes in a genre I am not particularly fond of. Actually that’s not really true – I like a good thriller, but I am a pretty squeamish kind of guy, and Koontz (or so the book blurbs would imply) has a tendency to delve into the darker and more horrific sides of human nature. Having said that, I must admit I really enjoyed Velocity. I couldn’t put it down, turning the pages into the wee small hours of the morning.

Previously, in other posts I have mentioned that I don’t like serial killer books (mostly in posts where I have reviewed a serial killer book – funny about that!). So with that knowledge you’re probably wondering why or how I came to read Velocity at all. It was pure chance. When buying another book, the store I was in was having a promotion – and I was able to select another book for free from a shelf in the store. This shelf was poorly stocked for male readers. There were quite a few ‘chic-lit’ novels, but about two that would appeal to guys like me – one of them was a reprint of Casino Royale – and those who know me, can be assured that I already have in excess of ten copies of CR, with various covers already scattered throughout the house. The other was Velocity.

Many regular visitors here may also know – that apart from being squeamish –  I dabble in graphic design, and as such, over the years have been known to comment on cover artwork, on things that ‘work’ and things that definitely ‘don’t work’. The thing here to remember is that ‘graphic design’ and ‘marketing’ are two very different disciplines, and while a book cover may be well designed, it does not necessarily follow that it reflects the nature of the story – or perhaps more importantly, sell copies of the book.

The paperback edition of Velocity that I picked up (you can see the cover at the top of this post), is what I’d consider a lazy and messy design. But as a marketing tool, it is incredibly strong – but first to help explain what I mean, maybe it’s time I had a quick look at the story.

The story concerns Billy Wiles who works as a bartender in the Napa Valley. Billy is an amiable enough guy, but over the years he has suffered a few hardships and setbacks. These days he keeps pretty much to himself. One evening, after finishing his shift at the bar, in the carpark, tucked under his windscreen wiper, he finds as note. Paraphrased it says:

‘If you don’t take this note to the police, I will KILL a lovely blonde schoolteacher somewhere in Napa County

……………………………………………………………………………………..

If you do take this note to the police, I will instead KILL an elderly woman.

You have six hours to decide. The choice is yours’

It’s a beautiful setup. Even by not acting, and ignoring the note, Billy is making a choice. He is a part of the game – with a madman – regardless if he likes it or not.

But briefly, back to the cover art – the words from the note are depicted on the cover. Now graphically, it is not high art – it is quite messy. But from a marketing point of view, without having read a page, simply picking the book up, I really wanted to know which decision Billy was going to make and why? Simply,  I had to buy this book. There were questions that needed to be answered.

That note is really the whole setup to the story. Like it or not, Billy is drawn into a cat and mouse game against a serial killer who appears to know Billy’s moves one step before Billy even knows them.

The central conceit of the book, to make the story work, is that Billy as a fourteen-year-old boy was seriously mistreated by the head police officer in Napa County, John Palmer. While Palmer is only in the story for a few pages, his spectral presence colours every move that Billy makes. Which sort of rules out the old ‘why don’t you just go to the police’ scenario. The thing here, is Koontz tells his story with such pace, while reading the story, you actually don’t question the logic and  trust and go with the character of Billy.

The story is very well written within the narrow scope that Koontz has chosen to place his story in. Everything is through Billy’s eyes, while this helps in understanding Billy’s perspective, it does leave the other characters motivations rather thin.

It also hides the killer to the very end of the book, which works in the context of the story, but with barely any real interaction from the killer, the story lacks a certain menace. What I am clumsily alluding to is that the story lacks a villain that truly scares the pants of you. I know some people suggest that the ‘theatre of the mind’ is much scarier than what is shown or told, but I tend to believe that a hero is only as good as the villain that he is pitted against – and with the limited interaction between the main protagonists, the story does lack a certain edge.

Having said all that – rather than a serial killer thriller chiller – as a fast paced, page turning psycho drama, Velocity is top-notch. Koontz sets up the boundaries and the stories conceits early, and then just runs with them for all they are worth, and the end result is damn readable – so much so, that despite my nature, I will make an effort to seek out and read more of his work. It ain’t high art – but on a cold winter’s night, it’s a good excuse to lie in bed with the doona pulled around you, and be transported to another place – just for a few hours (or if you’re like me, well into the morning).

Velocity

Gettin' Square (2003)

Country: Australia
Director: Jonathan Teplitzky
Starring: Timothy Spall, Sam Worthington, David Wenham, Gary Waddell, John Brumpton, David Field, Gary Sweet
Music: MGF

Gettin’ Square is a comedy crime caper, set on Australia’s Gold Coast in Queensland. So rather than the dim, gloomy look that the Melbourne or Sydney based crime films have, this one is bathed in glorious sunshine. The characters even wear very bright coloured clothes, rather than the tailored black suits that seem to to the uniform de rigueur in these types of films. With the brighter colours comes a lighter film, that at times verges on outright comedy.

The film opens with a robbery. Four men, armed with shotguns, and their heads covered by balaclavas are in the back of a cabbed pick-up truck. The four men are Barry Wirth (Sam Worthington), Johnny Spitieri (David Wenham), Dennis Obst (Garry Waddell) and Lenny Morrison (John Brumpton). As the truck makes it’s way to the place where the robbery is to take place, a cassette, created by the criminal mastermind behind the operation plays, outlining each of the men’s objectives during the robbery.

The truck pulls up, and our four perpetrators hit an office block. Next we hear a gunshot, and then see Barry carrying out Johnny ‘Spit’, who has been shot in the chest. Apparently the manager had a gun hidden in the safe.

The film then cuts back to six months earlier. All four men were in prison, but each of them is up for parole. The parole hearings don’t go to well for them. Only Johnny Spitieri is released. As he packs his gear and says goodbye to Barry, he vows to ‘get square’ which in this instance doesn’t mean ‘seek vengeance’ but ‘go straight’.

Another bloke trying to go straight is Darren Barrington (Timothy Spall), known as ‘Dabba’ to his mates. Dabba runs a none-too-successful restaurant called the Texas Rose. As the restaurant is a money pit, Dabba’s legal advisor comes up with a scene, where they sell the property to developers for condominiums, but can buy in on the ground floor to set up a new revamped restaurant. The scheme will cost a few hundred thousand dollars, but that’s okay, because Dabba has some money squirreled away with his accountant Halliwell.

Back in prison, Barry receives a visit from bent copper, Arnie DeViers (David Field). DeViers is the cop who sent Barry away based on his false testimony. Obviously both men hate each others guts, and Barry isn’t too overjoyed to see him. But DeViers has news. Barry’s mother has died. DeViers hopes that the bad news will make Barry do something stupid, like throw a punch at him, and can be stitched up for a bit more time. But Barry plays it cool. In fact, his mother’s death helps to get him released.

You see, Barry has a younger brother Joey (Luke Pelger), and upon hearing about Barry’s mother’s death, the parole board, grant him early release to provide support and guidance for his younger sibling. The timing is good, because young Joey has fallen under the spell of two-bit gangster, Chicka Martin (Gary Sweet). Making things even messier, is that Martin has formed a business relationship with bent copper DeViers.

Meanwhile Dabba ends up with some legal problems, when Halliwell the accountant’s wife, finds her husband rooting around on her. As an act of vengeance, she tells the Criminal Investigations Commision (CIC) about her hubbie’s shady dealings and soon they come in and confiscate all his records. This trail of paperwork comes back to Dabba, and it looks like his new restaurant and condominium development has come crashing down.

Now on the outside, Barry is trying to find honest work. In prison he worked in the kitchen, so he tries to find work as a chef. But everywhere he goes, no-one wants to hire an ex-con. Eventually his path crosses Dabba’s and Barry ends up working as the chef at the Texas Rose. Of course, all these characters and connections lead to the robbery that opens the film.

As the Australian film industry is rather small, often you will see familiar faces in each film. Gettin’ Square is no different, and features many ‘old friends’ for viewers of Australian crime drama. Vince Colosimo isn’t in this one, but David Field fills the gap as the corrupt cop. Field had previously appeared in Ghosts Of The Civil Dead, Two Hands and Chopper. Another familiar face is Gary Sweet. Sweet who plays Chicka Martin in Gettin’ Square, played Chicka White in The Great Bookie Robbery. ‘Chicka’ appears to be a name that has stuck with him. He also appeared in Blue Murder; amongst many others.

Gettin’ Square is a great film, but I must admit, when I first watched it upon release, I was kinda disappointed. I wanted, and was expecting something a little harder. But if you accept that this film, and it’s characters are played as broad comedic stereotypes, then you’re going to have a very enjoyable time viewing this feature. David Wenham, who won a swag of awards for his performance, is particularly funny. His court appearance after the CIC subpoena him to appear, giving evidence against ‘Dabba’ is a great piece of physical acting. But overall, the acting by the ensemble cast is pretty good. As I mentioned earlier, the characters are broad comedic stereotypes, so it requires some solid acting to bring them to life, otherwise they simply be two dimensional cartoons. All in all, Gettin’ Square is an enjoyable feature.

Gettin' Square (2003)

Gettin’ Square (2003)

Country: Australia
Director: Jonathan Teplitzky
Starring: Timothy Spall, Sam Worthington, David Wenham, Gary Waddell, John Brumpton, David Field, Gary Sweet
Music: MGF

Gettin’ Square is a comedy crime caper, set on Australia’s Gold Coast in Queensland. So rather than the dim, gloomy look that the Melbourne or Sydney based crime films have, this one is bathed in glorious sunshine. The characters even wear very bright coloured clothes, rather than the tailored black suits that seem to to the uniform de rigueur in these types of films. With the brighter colours comes a lighter film, that at times verges on outright comedy.

The film opens with a robbery. Four men, armed with shotguns, and their heads covered by balaclavas are in the back of a cabbed pick-up truck. The four men are Barry Wirth (Sam Worthington), Johnny Spitieri (David Wenham), Dennis Obst (Garry Waddell) and Lenny Morrison (John Brumpton). As the truck makes it’s way to the place where the robbery is to take place, a cassette, created by the criminal mastermind behind the operation plays, outlining each of the men’s objectives during the robbery.

The truck pulls up, and our four perpetrators hit an office block. Next we hear a gunshot, and then see Barry carrying out Johnny ‘Spit’, who has been shot in the chest. Apparently the manager had a gun hidden in the safe.

The film then cuts back to six months earlier. All four men were in prison, but each of them is up for parole. The parole hearings don’t go to well for them. Only Johnny Spitieri is released. As he packs his gear and says goodbye to Barry, he vows to ‘get square’ which in this instance doesn’t mean ‘seek vengeance’ but ‘go straight’.

Another bloke trying to go straight is Darren Barrington (Timothy Spall), known as ‘Dabba’ to his mates. Dabba runs a none-too-successful restaurant called the Texas Rose. As the restaurant is a money pit, Dabba’s legal advisor comes up with a scene, where they sell the property to developers for condominiums, but can buy in on the ground floor to set up a new revamped restaurant. The scheme will cost a few hundred thousand dollars, but that’s okay, because Dabba has some money squirreled away with his accountant Halliwell.

Back in prison, Barry receives a visit from bent copper, Arnie DeViers (David Field). DeViers is the cop who sent Barry away based on his false testimony. Obviously both men hate each others guts, and Barry isn’t too overjoyed to see him. But DeViers has news. Barry’s mother has died. DeViers hopes that the bad news will make Barry do something stupid, like throw a punch at him, and can be stitched up for a bit more time. But Barry plays it cool. In fact, his mother’s death helps to get him released.

You see, Barry has a younger brother Joey (Luke Pelger), and upon hearing about Barry’s mother’s death, the parole board, grant him early release to provide support and guidance for his younger sibling. The timing is good, because young Joey has fallen under the spell of two-bit gangster, Chicka Martin (Gary Sweet). Making things even messier, is that Martin has formed a business relationship with bent copper DeViers.

Meanwhile Dabba ends up with some legal problems, when Halliwell the accountant’s wife, finds her husband rooting around on her. As an act of vengeance, she tells the Criminal Investigations Commision (CIC) about her hubbie’s shady dealings and soon they come in and confiscate all his records. This trail of paperwork comes back to Dabba, and it looks like his new restaurant and condominium development has come crashing down.

Now on the outside, Barry is trying to find honest work. In prison he worked in the kitchen, so he tries to find work as a chef. But everywhere he goes, no-one wants to hire an ex-con. Eventually his path crosses Dabba’s and Barry ends up working as the chef at the Texas Rose. Of course, all these characters and connections lead to the robbery that opens the film.

As the Australian film industry is rather small, often you will see familiar faces in each film. Gettin’ Square is no different, and features many ‘old friends’ for viewers of Australian crime drama. Vince Colosimo isn’t in this one, but David Field fills the gap as the corrupt cop. Field had previously appeared in Ghosts Of The Civil Dead, Two Hands and Chopper. Another familiar face is Gary Sweet. Sweet who plays Chicka Martin in Gettin’ Square, played Chicka White in The Great Bookie Robbery. ‘Chicka’ appears to be a name that has stuck with him. He also appeared in Blue Murder; amongst many others.

Gettin’ Square is a great film, but I must admit, when I first watched it upon release, I was kinda disappointed. I wanted, and was expecting something a little harder. But if you accept that this film, and it’s characters are played as broad comedic stereotypes, then you’re going to have a very enjoyable time viewing this feature. David Wenham, who won a swag of awards for his performance, is particularly funny. His court appearance after the CIC subpoena him to appear, giving evidence against ‘Dabba’ is a great piece of physical acting. But overall, the acting by the ensemble cast is pretty good. As I mentioned earlier, the characters are broad comedic stereotypes, so it requires some solid acting to bring them to life, otherwise they simply be two dimensional cartoons. All in all, Gettin’ Square is an enjoyable feature.

Gettin’ Square (2003)