King of the Outback: Free Promo

G’day all. Just a heads up that I will be offering my first Fight Card novel, King of the Outback for free (at Amazon for Kindle), next Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday (1st to the 3rd of July). Regular visitors are probably aware that I don’t do free promos very often, so if you’ve been contemplating getting on board the Fight Card series, here’s a great opportunity.

And if you do read King of the Outback (or any of my books for that matter), please consider writing an honest review at Amazon.

The link to the kindle edition is here.

After that, I will be following it up with a free promotion of my short story, Bushwhacked; also set in Australia. Bushwhacked can also be found as a bonus story in the Rumble in the Jungle paperback edition.

King of the Outback: Free Promo

Code 7, Victim 5!

Just a heads up (courtesy of Jason Murphy), that the 1960’s spy thriller, Code 7, Victim 5! will be released by Network in August as Victim Five.

Here’s the spiel from the Network site:

Former Tarzan Lex Barker, Walter Rilla and Ronald Fraser star in a mid-sixties British thriller that takes full advantage of its spectacular South African setting, showcasing sumptuous imagery from cinematographer Nicolas Roeg. Blending breathtaking scenery, action and romance, Victim Five is available here in a brand-new transfer from the original film elements.

When a millionaire’s beloved valet is slain, suave American PI Steve Martin is hired to find the killer. His investigation takes him to Cape Town, where he learns the murder was linked to a group of Nazi prisoners of war who never returned to Germany; vertiginous car chases, knife-wielding assailants, sharks, lions and stampeding ostriches are just a few of the perils he encounters in his search for the truth!

You can read full details here.

Code 7, Victim 5!

Nobody Dies For Free

Pro Se Press enters the spy arena with their latest release, Nobody Dies For Free, written by Aaron Smith.

In NOBODY DIES FOR FREE, Richard Monroe wants nothing more than early retirement and a peaceful life in Paris with the only woman he’s ever truly loved after years of loyally serving his country in the CIA. But when an assassin’s bullet takes his happiness away, Monroe embarks on a quest to find the man responsible for the tragedy. Monroe is soon recruited back into the clandestine services, but with a difference.

I am a big fan of the ‘Retiree’ spy story. Forgive me, as I talk about films for a moment – but I figure most visitors to this site are more familiar with filmland’s spies rather than the myriad of novels that share the same themes.

To me, there are two variations on the retiree spy story. The first and most obvious variation is where the old retired masterspy is called back into action for one final mission because he has a skill set that is essential to the successful completion of the mission. There are a whole swag of films like this, such as Firefox with Clint Eastwood, or even the Matt Helm films with Dean Martin. In the Helm films, Dino has retired and wants to be left alone with his camera and coterie of dolly birds, but somehow gets dragged back into the action time and time again. The mini-series, Icon based on Frederick Forsyth’s book, with Patrick Swayze also trots out the formula once again. Swayze’s character is called out of retirement because of his knowledge of antiquated biological agents.

The second variation, which could almost be called the ‘messed with the wrong guy’ spy film, usually features a band of villains picking on a person or group of civilians (often a family). It just so happens that these people have been befriended by or related to a retired bad-ass spy. To the villains, the spy just seems like an old codger (or a nobody), but we know, despite the wrinkles, this guy is a lethal weapon. If the plot device sounds familiar, it is. The 1987 film, Malone, starring Burt Reynolds is essentially an updated version of the classic western, Shane. Television shows in particular have latched onto this style of story, with Man In A Suitcase, The Equalizer, and even Burn Notice featuring agents who have been ‘retired’ from active duty, and now spend their time helping out average Joes with their problems. On a more personal level, both Belly Of The Beast with Steven Seagal and Taken with Liam Neeson feature stories where they play retired spies, but their daughters have been foolishly kidnapped by evil doers. Once this happens the gloves are off, and the old retired spy is once again up to his usual tricks doing everything possible to get their loved one back. As you’d expect with this kind of storyline, generally these films tend to play more like a revenge flick and have a tendency to be rather violent.

But Nobody Dies For Free appears to be something different – a mixture of the two styles.

Now a lone agent reporting to a supervisor so mysterious that the official agencies don’t even know he exists, Monroe will deal with situations too delicate and too dangerous for the CIA or FBI to handle. On his first assignment, he discovers a connection between the mission and the criminal mastermind behind his wife’s killing. Business becomes personal again and Richard Monroe sets out to teach his enemies a brutal lesson: Nobody Dies For Free.

I am looking forward to reading this one. It seems just like my cup of tea. Below is full the press release from Pro Se.

* * * * *

Intrigue, Espionage, and Danger are primary parts of one of the most enduring genres in modern fiction to date- the Spy Novel. And now Pro Se Productions, a leading independent publisher of Genre Fiction and New Pulp enters into this dynamic field with the latest work from noted author Aaron Smith- NOBODY DIES FOR FREE!

Known for his thirty published stories in multiple genres as well as his work with a wide range of characters, including Sherlock Holmes and Allan Quatermain, Smith adds one of his many own original characters to his writing resume- Richard Monroe.

“I first became aware of the spy genre,” Smith states, “as I suspect many people did, through the James Bond movies. I must have been six or seven when I saw my first one. I became a big fan of those movies and eventually of Ian Fleming’s Bond novels too. As the years went on, I came to enjoy other spy fiction as well, some as fun and occasionally over-the-top as Bond or Mission: Impossible, some much more serious, like the novels of John Le Carre, and some in-between the two extremes, stuff like the Jason Bourne movies. Having long had an interest in that type of story, I suppose it was inevitable that I’d eventually write my own.”

In NOBODY DIES FOR FREE, Richard Monroe wants nothing more than early retirement and a peaceful life in Paris with the only woman he’s ever truly loved after years of loyally serving his country in the CIA. But when an assassin’s bullet takes his happiness away, Monroe embarks on a quest to find the man responsible for the tragedy. Monroe is soon recruited back into the clandestine services, but with a difference.

Now a lone agent reporting to a supervisor so mysterious that the official agencies don’t even know he exists, Monroe will deal with situations too delicate and too dangerous for the CIA or FBI to handle. On his first assignment, he discovers a connection between the mission and the criminal mastermind behind his wife’s killing. Business becomes personal again and Richard Monroe sets out to teach his enemies a brutal lesson: Nobody Dies For Free.

Featuring a stunning cover by Ariane Soares with Fitztown and formatting and design by Sean Ali as well as Ebook formatting by Russ Anderson, NOBODY DIES FOR FREE presents a brand new spy to fiction that, while bearing similarities to other literary brethren, clearly stands on his own merits.

According to Smith, “He has certain similarities to James Bond and many other fictional spies: he’s handsome, brave, sneaky, ruthless, and enjoys the company of beautiful women. But he’s his own person too. He rarely uses clever gadgets and is more likely to rely on just his wits, his gun, his car, and a cell phone. He’s American, though his personality has also been shaped by the time he’s spent in many parts of the world. He doesn’t work for a large organization like the CIA or FBI, although he used to. Now he’s much more a solo agent, taking on missions too secret or sensitive for the more official agencies.”

NOBODY DIES FOR FREE is available via Pro Se’s own store, at Amazon, and through Barnes and Noble in print for $15.00!

Smith’s Spy Novel is also available as an ebook for only $2.99 for Kindle, on the Nook, and for most other digital formats at Smashwords!

NOBODY DIES FOR FREE by Aaron Smith from Pro Se Productions! Available now!

Find more about Smith and his other work at http://www.godsandgalaxies.blogspot.com

Pro Se Productions- http://www.prose-press.com

Nobody Dies For Free

Dead Drop: The True Story of Oleg Penkovsky

Just a heads up to real-life spy fans that Jeremy Duns’ latest book, entitled Dead Drop: The True Story of Oleg Penkovsky and the Cold War’s Most Dangerous Operation is now available in Hardback in the UK. Unlike the Paul Dark thrillers, Dead Drop is non-fiction, and looks at the life of Soviet double agent Oleg Penkovsky.

Here’s the official spiel:

In August 1960, a Soviet colonel called Oleg Penkovsky tried to make contact with the West. His first attempt was to approach two American students in Moscow. He handed them a bulky envelope and pleaded with them to deliver it to the American embassy. Inside was an offer to work as a ‘soldier-warrior’ for the free world. MI6 and the CIA ran Penkovsky jointly, in an operation that ran through the showdown over Berlin and the Cuban Missile Crisis. He provided crucial intelligence, including photographs of rocket manuals that helped Kennedy end the Cuba crisis and avert a war. Codenamed HERO, Penkovsky is widely seen as the most important spy of the Cold War, and the CIA-MI6 operation, run as the world stood on the brink of nuclear destruction, has never been bettered. But how exactly did the Russians detect Penkovsky, and why did they let him continue his contact with his handlers for months afterwards? Could it be that the whole Cuban Missile Crisis was part of a Soviet deception operation – and has another betrayal hidden in plain sight all these years? Thrilling, evocative and hugely controversial, Dead Drop blows apart the myths surrounding one of the Cold War’s greatest spy operations.

You can obtain Dead Drop from Amazon UK, Book Depository and other good books stores.

Dead Drop: The True Story of Oleg Penkovsky

Action: Pulse Pounding Tales – Volume 2 is live

Last year I was lucky enough to have a story in an anthology called Action: Pulse Pounding Tales, which was put together by Matt Hilton (author of the Joe Hunter series). Now it’s time for a return bout.

Like The Expendables 2, but in book form, Action: Pulse Pounding Tales returns in a second volume that is BIGGER, BETTER and more violent than before. My contribution is a follow-up to last year’s blood and thunder tale Cutter’s Law. The new story is entitled Get Cutter!

This story sees Nathan Cutter behind bars – after the events in Cutter’s Law – with a bounty on his head. In the tradition of Escape From Alcatraz (and I am not ashamed to say, Lockup), Cutter must fight to stay alive in Ironbark Correctional Institution, in Sydney, Australia. Relentless pulse pounding action ensues.

The blurb:

30 Action-packed Pulse Pounding Tales!

That’s exactly what you get in this collection of action stories from Matt Hilton, Paul D Brazill, Richard Godwin, Rod Glenn and many other established thriller authors, including stories from bestselling ebook authors and exciting up-and-comers.

Think back to the days when heroes were heroes and the action was furious and full-blooded. When often as not, the hero was quite the opposite: an anti-hero – but he needed to be, to bring the kind of violent justice to villains worse than him. When political correctness took a back seat, even as the bullets and karate chops were flying. Basically it was good old harmless fun. It was a case of disengaging your moral compass and getting down with the hero as they took on all comers, and they did it with balletic grace and uncompromising violence. Gratuitous? Mostly. Realistic? Not always. Great fun? You betcha!!!

Then fast forward to the here and now: What if the current action and thriller authors set their minds to bringing back the action genres of old?

Well, that question is answered here, for the second time: Within these pages you will find hit men, secret agents, vigilantes, private eyes, assassins and professional thieves, savage warriors and one or two others who can’t be easily categorized, all kicking ass and taking names. Some of the tales are delivered with shocking realism, some as lighter entertainment, some on the grittier side, but each and every tale included in Action: Pulse Pounding Tales Volume 2 is sure to get your heart racing.

Kick back and enjoy the ride!

Here’s what you’ll find inside.

Introduction by Matt Hilton
Dirk Ramm: Unsheathed by Matt Hilton
Sins of Omission by Ian Graham
See Saw by James Oliver Hilton
Uninvited Guests by Rod Glenn
The Missionary by Paul D Brazill
Hard Wood by Tyson Adams
Black Tuesday by Alex Shaw
.50 Contingency Plan by Jochem Vandersteen
Cold Redemption By Les Morris
Kokoro by Andrew Scorah
Get Cutter! By James Hopwood
Jardine Rides Again by Ian McAdam
Jack Be Nimble by Gavin Hunt
Exit Wound by Steve Christie
As Heroes Fall By Frank Sonderborg
Goofy Brings The House Down by Richard Godwin
Grand Central: Terminal by Terrence P. McCauley
The Fixer by Dean Breckenridge
Soup Sandwich by Christopher L. Irvin
Pasnuta Means Arena of Death! by Richard Prosch
Mududa’s Revenge by Graham Smith
97 Ways To Die In Istanbul by Paul Grzegorzek
It’s Noir or Never by Absolutely*Kate
Push by Kevin Michaels
You Only Die Once by Rhesa Sealy
Man About Town by Alan Griffiths
Hanoi Heat by Iain Purdie
Hammertime by Asher Wismer
When The Devil Catches Up by Lee Hughes

Bonus Tale
Suited and Booted by Matt Hilton

It’s nice to see a couple of my Fight Card colleagues, Kevin Michaels and Terrence McCauley have stories in this collection.

You can get it by clicking here.

Of course, Volume 1 is still available. It is a great collection of stories – thirty-seven tales of thrills, spills, kills, and guns galore – written by thirty-six authors, including Zoe Sharp, Matt Hilton, Adrian Magson, Steven Savile, Paul D. Brazill, Richard Godwin, and many more.

It’s available from Amazon USA click here and for those in the UK click here.

Action: Pulse Pounding Tales – Volume 2 is live