Tiffany Memorandum (1967)

tiffany 3Country: Italy | France | Germany
Director: Sergio Greico (as Terence Hathaway)
Starring: Ken Clark, Irina Demick, Jacques Berthier, Luigi Vannuchi, Gregoire Aslan
Music: Riz Ortolani

The plot for the Tiffany Memorandum is more twisted than a bag of pretzels, with every character, with the exception of the blond haired square jawed hero, Dick Hallan (Ken Clark), presenting as someone different to who they truly are. As for the memorandum of the title, if you analyse the plot, it doesn’t even make sense. There is no memorandum as such – and if you’ll forgive the minor spoiler – the maguffin is a piece of videotape that has been used, like a ribbon, to decorate a negligee designed by Madame Tiffany. Yeah, you’re reading that and thinking I am speaking jibberish. Videotape! Wouldn’t that rub against the skin? As I said, it doesn’t really make sense, but let’s go with the flow, shall we? And maybe start at the beginning.

The Tiffany Memorandum starts in Paris. Dick Hallan, a reporter for the Herald Tribune, walks through the neon jungle to a swinging and infectious theme tune by Riz Ortolani. He ends up at an illegal gambling house and after casing the room, takes a seat at the roulette wheel. Whether Hallan is working a story or just there to blow some of his hard earned cash is never explained. He places a bet. As the wheel spins the croupier reaches for a secret button under the table – a device to ensure there are no winners. Hallan grabs the croupier’s hand before he has a chance to activate the device. The ball runs its natural course, and what-do-you-know, Hallan’s number comes up.

140324-tiffany-memorandum-0-230-0-341-cropAnother gambler also benefits from Hallan’s intervention – this gentleman just happens to be Francisco Aguirrez (Michel Bardinet) – the highly favoured democratic candidate for the Republic of El Salvador. Hallan and Aquirrez become friends and leave the club together. As they walk back to their hotel, hoods from the casino come after Hallan – trying to get back their money. While Hallan engages in some brutish fisticuffs, Aguirrez is assassinated in a drive by shooting.

There is naturally enough a police investigation. At the police station, Hallan notices that Aquirrez’s chauffeur, is brought in for questioning. For some reason, to Hallan, that makes him the prime suspect, and he chooses to follow him. The chauffeur boards a train to Berlin – with his travelling companion, Sylvie Maynard (Irina Demick). Hallan also boards the train. On route, the train is derailed – you really have to see the model used for this, it is little more than a standard Hornby train set. The end result of this calamity is that the chauffeur is killed and in the confusion, Hallan is mistaken for him.

o_tiffany-memorandum-ken-clark-ws-94bc

From here on out, the film gets confusing with multiple parties all after the macguffin. There are car chases, fist fights and a crazy climax at a television studio.

In the past I have enjoyed Ken Clark’s other spy outings – Mission Bloody Mary, From the Orient With Fury and Special Mission: Lady Chaplin – but apart from one or two stylish touches, Tiffany Memorandum falls flat. It tries too hard to keep the viewer guessing, twisting and turning every which way, but by the 97th plot twist most viewers will have given up trying to follow the plot – and arty visuals do not a film make. This is one for the hard core EuroSpy fans only.

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Tiffany Memorandum (1967)

Hercules Against The Mongols (1963)

Director: Domenico Paolella
Starring: Mark Forest, José Greci, Ken Clark, Howard Ross, Nadir Moretti, Maria Grazia Spina
Music: Carlo Savina

A little while ago, I reviewed Hercules Against The Barbarians, which I didn’t think too highly of. Those who have visited this blog before may have noticed that I had attached an incorrect poster image for that film. How many Hercules films starring Mark Forest, Ken Clark, and José Greci; and directed by Domenico Paolella could there be? How many times could Hercules take on the Mongol hordes? Well, two! In fact this film came before Hercules Against The Barbarians, and thankfully this film is slightly better than it ‘unofficial’ sequel.

In Hercules Against The Barbarians, Ken Clark played one of Genghis Khan’s sons (Kubilai), but this time he plays Sayan. But in both films he had to sport a silly hairpiece and a droopy moustache. And Mark Forest, while still pretty dour, plays Hercules slightly lighter than some of his other performances. As I have mentioned in other reviews, I am not the biggest fan of Forest’s Hercules. At best the Hercules films are the progeny of the swashbuckling films of the thirties and the forties. Errol Flynn and Tyrone Power always had a cheeky smile. Not so Forest. He is workman like in his approach.

Onto the movie: The film opens with Hercules pushing over a tree, to make a bridge for a family to cross a river. As thanks, the mother, who has powers of divination, looks into the future. She sees Hercules fighting a mighty dragon – the dragon being a clumsy metaphor for the Mongolian army.

It’s 1227 and Genghis Khan has died. His dying wish was for peace with the West, but his three sons have other ideas. Each of the sons is a fierce warrior. The sons are: Kin Kahn (Nadir Moretti) who has incredible strength; Sayan (Ken Clark) whose arrows never miss their mark; and Susdal (Howard Ross) who uses a whip with incomparable skill.

So at the behest of the Sons of Khan, the Mongols go to war. The first city they attack is Tudela. The Mongols ride in on their horses waving their spears around. This footage is recycled in the opening to Hercules Against The Barbarians. This footage is intercut with footage of Sayan firing his arrows at the townsfolk. With each kill he laughs maniacally. He is such an evil fellow, and we cannot wait for him to get his comeuppance.

The Mongols kill the king and take control of the city. But there are two heirs to the throne. The first is Bianca of Tudela, played by the beautiful José Greci. Greci also appeared in Hercules Against The Barbarians (as Arminia). She can also be seen in Hercules Vs The Masked Rider, Seven Rebel Gladiators, Sword of the Empire, and Goliath and the Sins of Babylon. For Eurospy fans she also appeared in Espionage in Tangiers and Operazione Poker. She was a very busy girl in the sixties.

The other heir to the throne of Tudela is an adolescent boy, Alexander (who appears to be dubbed by a woman). Alexander has escaped the city with some of the townsfolk and is trying to elude the pursuing Mongol horde.

Naturally Alexander crosses paths with mighty Hercules. Lucky too, because at that moment, the Mongols attack on horseback. Hercules steps into the fray, picks up a giant tree trunk and takes on the soldiers. The soldiers are a pretty stupid bunch. Due to the size of the tree trunk, Hercules doesn’t do much swinging. He more or less, jabs at the soldiers. Despite Hercules immobility, the soldiers continually ride into the trunk and fall off their horses. It’s all rather silly, but it is, after all, a Hercules film.

Hercules Against The Mongols
isn’t the worst peplum you’ll see, but it isn’t inspired either. However it is a step up from the dreary Hercules Against The Barbarians, and it always intrigues me to see another chapter in the strange career of Ken Clark: Cowboy, Gentleman Spy, and Mongol.

Then again, didn’t John Wayne play a Barbarian? Well, if it is good enough for the Duke…

Hercules Against The Mongols (1963)

Hercules Against The Mongols (1963)

Director: Domenico Paolella
Starring: Mark Forest, José Greci, Ken Clark, Howard Ross, Nadir Moretti, Maria Grazia Spina
Music: Carlo Savina

A little while ago, I reviewed Hercules Against The Barbarians, which I didn’t think too highly of. Those who have visited this blog before may have noticed that I had attached an incorrect poster image for that film. How many Hercules films starring Mark Forest, Ken Clark, and José Greci; and directed by Domenico Paolella could there be? How many times could Hercules take on the Mongol hordes? Well, two! In fact this film came before Hercules Against The Barbarians, and thankfully this film is slightly better than it ‘unofficial’ sequel.

In Hercules Against The Barbarians, Ken Clark played one of Genghis Khan’s sons (Kubilai), but this time he plays Sayan. But in both films he had to sport a silly hairpiece and a droopy moustache. And Mark Forest, while still pretty dour, plays Hercules slightly lighter than some of his other performances. As I have mentioned in other reviews, I am not the biggest fan of Forest’s Hercules. At best the Hercules films are the progeny of the swashbuckling films of the thirties and the forties. Errol Flynn and Tyrone Power always had a cheeky smile. Not so Forest. He is workman like in his approach.

Onto the movie: The film opens with Hercules pushing over a tree, to make a bridge for a family to cross a river. As thanks, the mother, who has powers of divination, looks into the future. She sees Hercules fighting a mighty dragon – the dragon being a clumsy metaphor for the Mongolian army.

It’s 1227 and Genghis Khan has died. His dying wish was for peace with the West, but his three sons have other ideas. Each of the sons is a fierce warrior. The sons are: Kin Kahn (Nadir Moretti) who has incredible strength; Sayan (Ken Clark) whose arrows never miss their mark; and Susdal (Howard Ross) who uses a whip with incomparable skill.

So at the behest of the Sons of Khan, the Mongols go to war. The first city they attack is Tudela. The Mongols ride in on their horses waving their spears around. This footage is recycled in the opening to Hercules Against The Barbarians. This footage is intercut with footage of Sayan firing his arrows at the townsfolk. With each kill he laughs maniacally. He is such an evil fellow, and we cannot wait for him to get his comeuppance.

The Mongols kill the king and take control of the city. But there are two heirs to the throne. The first is Bianca of Tudela, played by the beautiful José Greci. Greci also appeared in Hercules Against The Barbarians (as Arminia). She can also be seen in Hercules Vs The Masked Rider, Seven Rebel Gladiators, Sword of the Empire, and Goliath and the Sins of Babylon. For Eurospy fans she also appeared in Espionage in Tangiers and Operazione Poker. She was a very busy girl in the sixties.

The other heir to the throne of Tudela is an adolescent boy, Alexander (who appears to be dubbed by a woman). Alexander has escaped the city with some of the townsfolk and is trying to elude the pursuing Mongol horde.

Naturally Alexander crosses paths with mighty Hercules. Lucky too, because at that moment, the Mongols attack on horseback. Hercules steps into the fray, picks up a giant tree trunk and takes on the soldiers. The soldiers are a pretty stupid bunch. Due to the size of the tree trunk, Hercules doesn’t do much swinging. He more or less, jabs at the soldiers. Despite Hercules immobility, the soldiers continually ride into the trunk and fall off their horses. It’s all rather silly, but it is, after all, a Hercules film.

Hercules Against The Mongols
isn’t the worst peplum you’ll see, but it isn’t inspired either. However it is a step up from the dreary Hercules Against The Barbarians, and it always intrigues me to see another chapter in the strange career of Ken Clark: Cowboy, Gentleman Spy, and Mongol.

Then again, didn’t John Wayne play a Barbarian? Well, if it is good enough for the Duke…

Hercules Against The Mongols (1963)

Hercules Against The Barbarians (1964)

AKA: Masciste In the Hell Of Genghis Khan
Director: Domenico Paolella
Starring: Mark Forest, José Greci, Ken Clark, Gloria Milland, Roldano Lupi
Music: Giuseppe Piccillo, Carlo Savina

As with most of the Peplum films that are out there, there appears to be many versions of this film, varying in running time from about 90 minutes to 120 minutes. As well as differing running times, the films hero seems to change from either Hercules or Masciste, the son of Hercules. But that shouldn’t matter too much. The version I am reviewing here is the shortened American version, Hercules Against The Barbarians, which features Mark Forest as the titular Hercules.

The movie starts off with Genghis Khan and his Mongol army invading Poland. Actually we don’t see the invasion, only lots of Mongols, waving spears of horseback. The narrator tells us the Mongols have suffered their first defeat. We are also told that Hercules has fought alongside the Polish, like a ‘tornado’. And when we finally clap eyes on Hercules, he is being thanked, slapped on the back and sent on his way. The opening seems like a bit of a ripoff to me. We hear of a great battle but don’t see it.

Hercules is heading back to Arminia (José Greci), his fiancé, but before he arrives, strange things are happening in her village. Firstly a woman, Arias (Gloria Milland) is being chased by an angry mob. They accuse her of being a witch and want to burn her at the stake. She finds refuge in Arminia and her father’s cottage. However, he protection doesn’t last too long, as a band of Mongols arrive and kidnap Arminia, and kill her father. Arias is left arrive, and blamed for the atrocity. The mob quickly pick up their flaming torches once more and tie Arias to a stake. But just before going up in flames, she is rescued once more, this time by Hercules.

It is determined that the Mongols have taken Arminia to the city of Tornapol, where she is being held captive by Genghis Khan (Roldano Lupi). Naturally enough, Hercules and his new lady friend, Arias, set off in a bid to rescue Arminia.

The real villain in this movie is Kubilai, played by an almost unrecognizable Ken Clark (weird hair, silly moustache). Kubilai is a vicious piece of work, prepared to kill anyone who hinders his ascension to power, including his father and his brother. His malevolence is shown when he stabs one of his lovers in the heart after she has learnt too much about Kubilai’s plans.

At this time, Hercules Against The Barbarians veers into Tarzan territory. Hercules battles various rubber creatures during his travels including a giant python, and a crocodile. Forest makes an admirable attempt at making the croc fight seem real, but cannot overcome the glaringly fake rubber reptile.

For me, Hercules Against The Barbarians is a weak entry in the Sword and Sandal series. Forest is not my favourite Hercules. He takes the role far too seriously and always looks to be in pain. On top of that this movie is fairly slowed paced and drags between action sequences. There is one sequence that is worth mentioning though. It is in the palace of Genghis Khan, and we are treated to an array of ‘regal’ entertainment, including oriental dancers spinning plates on sticks, and acrobats spinning and tumbling over giant flags as they are swirled around the room. The entertainment culminates with Hercules and one of Genghis Khan’s warriors fighting to the death in a gauntlet of (rubber tipped) spears.

Hercules Against The Barbarians (1964)

Special Mission Lady Chaplin (1966)

AKA: Operation Lady Chaplin
Country: Spain / Italy / France
Directed by Alberto De Martino
Ken Clark, Daniella Bianchi, Jacques Bergerac, Phillipe Hersent, Evelyn Stewart, Mabel Karr, Helga Liné
Music by Bruno Nicolai
Song, ‘Lady Chaplin’, sung by Bobby Solo

What is it that attracts the worlds spy story tellers to scorpions? Just of the top of my head I know there are two Bond films with scorpions – Diamonds Are Forever and Die Another Day, coincidentally both made after this flick. Then there’s The Scorpio Letters and Scorpio – okay no actual scorpions but playing on the image of the scorpion. Modesty Blaise has a giant scorpion tattoo on her leg in Joseph Losey’s 1966 film. If you look at books, John Gardner had a Bond continuation novel called Scorpius (can’t remember the story but I don’t think there were any scorpions – I seem to recall a lot of snakes though); and Anthony Horrowitz, in this Alex Rider series had Scorpia – lots and lots of scorpions, yeah! Why is the scorpion such a potent espionage symbol? I don’t know really, but I thought that was a good way to kick off the review for Special Mission Lady Chaplin which features a madman who keeps pet scorpions.

The film is actually the third film in the Ken Clark 077 films, and as I would have mentioned previously, despite the large amount of films marketed with 077 in their title, there are only actually three films in the series. This entry opens with a nun driving a Citroen delivery van up a winding mountain road to a monastery. Two monks greet her as she brings in a basket of fresh linen. She places the basket on a table and removes some of the items. Underneath she has hidden a machine gun, which she grabs, turns and fires, mowing down the monks. She then searches the monastery until she finds a cabinet with a large radio transmitter. She blasts the radio to hell and then, her mission complete, leaves the scene. Unbeknownst to the machine gun wielding nun, there was actually a third monk, who was outside when she arrived. He survives her onslaught and slips away safely.

The surviving monk makes his way to the US Embassy in Madrid and bargains for immunity with a dog tag from a US Naval Officer. As you may have guessed, this man is not really a monk, and you’re probably wondering why would a dog tag be important. It just so happens that it belonged to an officer on the US Thresher, which was a submarine that sank twelve months previously. It went down in water so deep that it could not be salvaged. The Thresher also happened to be carrying sixteen Polaris missiles. Now if the sub was too deep to be salvaged, then how did the officers dog tag reach the surface? And that’s just exactly the question that Heston (Phillipe Hersent), the Head of the CIA wants answered. To get answers he turns to his top man, Dick Malloy, Agent 077.

Malloy is immediately shunted off to make contact with the surviving monk and retrieve the dog tag. As soon as he makes contact, a man in a black turtle neck pops up with a gun and tries to kill the monk. Malloy intervenes and the first of many chases takes place.

The nun who performed the hit at the monastery happens to be Arabel Chaplin (Daniella Bianchi), who is a master of disguise. She works for a slimy fellow called Kobra Zoltan (Jacques Bergerac). Zoltan just happens to run the world’s largest salvage company and is the only person who could have possibly reached the Thresher. He immediately becomes a prime suspect in Malloy’s investigations.

The third and in some ways finest of the 077 series is buoyed by the addition of Daniela Bianchi to the cast as the mysterious Lady Chaplin. Is she a good girl or a bad girl? Well it doesn’t really matter – during her scenes she is fine clothes horse, outfitted by some lurid creations by Casa d’Alta Moda. While this film clearly has a larger budget than the first two films in the series, the money appears to have gone solely to the very splashy wardrobes of the female stars. But sadly for poor old Ken Clark, the star of the series, he gets lumped with a set of trousers that are clearly too short for his lanky frame.

As with most Eurospy films, Special Mission Lady Chaplin benefits greatly from the location shooting for the outdoor action sequences. Rest assured that the interiors were filmed in Italy, but this story visits locations as diverse as New York, the Costa Del Sol, Madrid, London, Paris and finally Morocco. All in all, Special Mission Lady Chaplin is a pretty tight little thriller. As you’d expect from a film of this vintage, some of the ideas are a bit outlandish, but this film certainly isn’t as silly as many of it’s contemporaries.

Special Mission Lady Chaplin (1966)

Mission Bloody Mary (1965)


AKA Agent 077 Mission Bloody Mary
Operation Blue Lotus
Directed by Terrence Hathaway (Sergio Grieco)
Ken Clark, Mitsouko, Philippe Hersent, Helga Liné
Music by Angelo Francesco Lavagnino

Mission Bloody Mary is one of the best entries in the Eurospy genre. Ken Clark is Dick Malloy, Agent 077, on the trail of The Black Lotus, an evil organisation who have stolen a nuclear warhead. Sure, the film borrows heavily from Thunderball and even From Russia With Love but is done fairly slickly and paced so rapidly, you don’t have time to notice the holes in the plot.

Let’s look at the holey plot. It’s an absolutely miserable night. As the rain teems down a military jeep makes it’s way toward the Strategic Air Command base in Coatbridge (near Glasgow) A loan airforce officer is driving. As he approaches the base, a young lady, Kuan (Mitsouko), all dressed in red and soaked to the skin, flags him down. Her car has broken down. He offers assistance (who wouldn’t?) For his trouble he ends up with a knife in his belly. Two other men emerge from the shadows. One on them dons an airforce uniform and takes the officers place behind the wheel. He proceeds to the base and past the sentries.

The movie cuts to a montage of newspapers from around the world. Each proclaims that a U.S. aircraft carrying nuclear warheads has crashed in France. In Washington intelligence chiefs have gathered and are discussing the incident. The plane was carrying a new nuclear weapon, the B-32, also known as ‘The Bloody Mary’. When the crash site was examined, the weapon was gone. It is agreed the weapon has be recovered discreetly. The head of the C.I.A., Mr. Heston (Philippe Hersent)assigns his best agent, Dick Malloy. Agent 077 (Ken Clark). Clark is a big hairy mountain of a man, which is a bit of a plus. When he gets into a fist-fight (which happens quite a bit), you can actually believe if he hit you, it would hurt. On the negative side (and this might just be the dubbing), he doesn’t seem too bright. He walks into a lot of traps set by the enemy.

When we first meet Malloy, he is entertaining a young lady. Barely dressed, they are rolling around on the bed, drinking champagne, and listening Nat King Cole records (well that’s the record sleeve beside the player – although it sounds remarkably like an instrumental of the title tune). His nocturnal activities are disrupted when he is called into the office. In the best sense of sixties style and fashion, Malloy slips on a snazzy red turtleneck (and trousers) and heads into the office.

His briefing takes place on the target range, where he is being fitted with a new range of weapons. Heston explains that The Black Lily, an evil organisation, is behind the theft of The Bloody Mary. Their headquarters are in France at the Betz Clinique. Malloy’s contact there will be Dr. Freeman. And in the best tradition of spy movies, there is a code phrase that Malloy will use to identify himself: ‘I am an old friend from San Francisco’.

Sooner rather than later, Malloy turns up at the Betz Clinique and makes his pre-arranged rendezvous with Dr. Freeman. Malloy is delighted to find out that Dr. Freeman is in a fact Elsa Freeman (Helga Liné), a woman.

Mission Bloody Mary has some good scenes. There’s a roof top gun battle, a sequence on a train (what good spy film doesn’t have a train scene?), a barroom brawl, and a stoush in the cargo hold of a ship. And there’s the usual double crossing, and false identities that you’d expect in a spy film. The movie also features a good musical score by Angelo Francesco Lavagnino. It’s a brassy trumpet sound, which at times seems like it would be better suited to a Spaghetti Western than a spy film. But all in all, this is a pretty good Eurospy package.

It is not my policy to endorse any particular company or product, but if you are searching for a copy of this film, rather than scouring the grey market, Dorado Films Inc, in the United States have released a nice clean copy on DVD.

For other Dick Malloy, Agent 077 films, see also:
From The Orient With Fury
Special Mission Lady Chaplin

Mission Bloody Mary (1965)

From The Orient With Fury (1965)


AKA:
Fury In The Orient
Agent 077 Operation Istanbul
Fury In Istanbul
Fury On The Bosphorus
Storm Over The Bosphorus

Directed by Terrence Hathaway (Sergio Grieco)
Ken Clark, Fernando Sancho, Margaret Lee, Philippe Hersent, Franco Ressel, Vitorrio Sanipoli, Mikaela
Music by Piero Piccioni
Songs ‘Before It’s Too Late’ and ‘You Wonderful You’ sung by Lydia Macdonald

From The Orient With Fury (or any of the myriad of other names that this film goes by), is the second in the Ken Clark 077 series, and while being a slight step down form the first, Mission Bloody Mary, it is still a fairly slick Eurospy production. The film opens with a nice pop art rotoscope title sequence and Lydia Macdonald singing ‘Before It’s Too Late’.

In Istanbul, Professor Franz Kurtz (Ennio Balbo) arrives at a hotel, with a coterie of reporters at his heels. He has just invented a Beta Ray that disintegrates metal. Accompanying the Professor is C.I.A. agent McFlint, whose job is to protect the Professor. As they pass through the hotel lobby McFlint is called to the telephone. As he takes the call, the Professor makes his way up to his room. Waiting for him inside are a handful of burly gorillas dressed as the house band. The Goons kidnap the Professor, smuggling him out, hidden in a case for a double bass.

When McFlint finally makes it up to the Kurtz’s room, all he finds is a dead body slumped in an armchair. As McFlint investigates, the bomb goes off destroying the hotel room. Naturally, the authorities believe the dead man in the armchair was Professor Kurtz, and the newspapers of the world are filled with reports about his demise.

Meanwhile in Paris, the Head of the C.I.A., Heston (Philpe Hersent) is meeting with Kurtz’s daughter, Romy. He explains that he had the fingerprints checked and is positive that her father is alive. Now he intends to put his best man on the case to find the Professor. That man is Dick Malloy – Agent 077 (Ken Clark).

When we catch up with Dick Malloy, he is involved in a bar fight. For what reason, we never find out. As he is on holidays, maybe that is how he relaxes? Mid fight he is interrupted by a telephone call from Heston, and is sent to Paris for a briefing.

Malloy’s mission is to pick up the trail of the kidnappers and the Professor. His first task is to meet with one of the Professor’s colleagues, Preminger, at a night club called Martignon. Malloy is at the club at the allotted time. But unfortunately Preminger is followed by the hoods who kidnapped Professor Kurtz. Before he can talk to Malloy, he is silenced by a poison needle. With his dying breath Preminger says to Malloy, ‘Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony’.

With barely a lead to go on, Malloy proceeds to Preminger’s house in a black Chevolet. Naturally enough for this sort of film, the villains of the piece, follow Malloy and a car chase takes place. As it is a spy film, Malloy’s car comes equipped with rear machine guns, and he disables his pursuers vehicle. And since we are talking about cars, one thing puzzles me about the appearance of Malloy’s black Chevy. I realise the 077 films do not have the budget of a Bond or a Flint, and sometimes things have to be done on the cheap. What I find strange though, is that the film-makers were too lazy to clean the bird-shit off the car windows before shooting the scenes. It is quite strange to see an urbane, sophisticated secret agent driving with two giant ‘splats’ on his driver’s side window, next to his head – classy stuff!

A spy film like this, would be complete without a bevy of beautiful women, and this film has three. The first, I have already mentioned, is Romy Kurtz (Evi Marandi). She’s also a scientist like her father, but unlike him, she has been completing her work in Moscow, and she is not so keen for her father’s work to be handed over to the American’s if Malloy should succeed.

Next we have the evil villainess, Simone Coplan (Fabienne Dali). She gives as good as she gets, and for her trouble she gets slapped around a little bit. Not only does she have to put up with some violent treatment, she has to put up with Malloy saying clumsy dialogue like: ‘Out with it, baby!’ as he crudely tries to interrogate her.

After two thirds of the film have passed, a favourite for fans of Eurospy films, Margaret Lee makes an appearance. Her character is also a secret agent called, Evelyn Stone. When we first meet Stone, she is in Malloy’s hotel suite and taking a shower. She teams up with Malloy at the end to track the villains to their lair and find the Professor. But mostly, she gets to play her signature role, another ditzy blonde. But hey, that’s why we like her!

What makes this film the weakest of the three Ken Clark, Dick Malloy films is that the villains role and character are hardly defined. Goldwyn (Franco Ressel), the architect of this evil plot is barely seen throughout the picture till the very end, and then he is hardly menacing. In fact, Simone Coplan would have been better as ‘the chief’.

From The Orient With Fury is not a complete waste of time, and is a fairly slick Eurospy production, but it does seem to lack direction and a climax worthy of the preceding hundred minutes.

It is not my policy to endorse any particular company or product, but if you searching for a copy of this film, rather than scouring the grey market, Dorado Films Inc, in the United States have released a nice clean copy on DVD.

This review is based on the Dorado Films Inc. USA DVD.

From The Orient With Fury (1965)