Kelly’s Heroes (1970)

Director: Brian G. Hutton
Starring: Clint Eastwood, Telly Savalas, Donald Sutherland, Don Rickles, Carroll O’Connor, Gavin MacLeod, Stuart Margolin, Jeff Morris, Harry Dean Stanton, Gene Collins, Perry Lopez, Hal Buckley, Karl-Otto Alberty
Music: Lalo Schifrin

After Where Eagles Dare, Clint Eastwood had starred in two flop movies. First there was Paint Your Wagon, which was one of the failures that nearly forced Paramount pictures into bankruptcy. Then he followed it up with Two Mules For Sister Sara, which again, wasn’t quite the success that he had hoped. Naturally, he looked at making another Where Eagles Dare to get punters bums back on seats. The result was Kelly’s Heroes. But Kelly’s Heroes is a bit different – it isn’t another blood and guts, shoot ‘em up, – it’s a caper film.

The film opens during the middle of a battle. Mortar shells are raining down and buildings are exploding. Behind enemy lines, Private Kelly (Clint Eastwood) has captured himself a German Intelligence Officer. He brings him back for interrogation. Inside the German’s attaché case, Kelly finds two lead bars. When questioned, the German says if he was captured he was to throw the case in a river. The lead weights were to weigh it down. Then Kelly notices that a bit of lead has been scraped away at the bottom of one of the bars. It looks like the lead coating is to disguise the gold bar underneath. Kelly starts plying the Officer with brandy to find out more.

Trailer uploaded to Youtube by: Weduc79

The liquor eventually loosens the Officer’s tongue, and he reveals that 14,000 gold bars have been placed in a bank in the town of Claremont. Claremont is 20 miles behind enemy lines, and the town (and bank) are guarded by three Tiger Tanks.

But Kelly thinks that he has been getting shot at, mortared and bombed on for virtually no reward at all. Why not make a little extra out of it? He decides to go after the gold. Luckily, his platoon, which is under the leadership of Big Joe (Telly Savalas) has just been relieved of duties on the front line, and has three days rest. Kelly convinces them all, that they should risk their lives, behind enemy lines to rob the bank.

But Kelly needs a little bit of help from a few outsiders. The first is Crapgame (Don Rickles). Crapgame is the supply officer. Through him, Kelly arranges all the weapons, ammunition and supplies he needs for the incursion. To go up against the three Tiger tanks in Claremont, Kelly enlists the aid of a misfit named Oddball (Donald Sutherland), who is in command of three Sherman tanks. With the motley crew assembled, the men head off into the warzone, each expecting a share in a $16,000,000 payday. Of course, it isn’t all beer and skittles, and the platoon has to face quite a few hardships before reaching their objective.

The film has a great ending too. When our squad of men have reached the bank in Claremont, and overcome nearly all obstacles, there is one last little hiccup. Parked in front of the bank is a Tiger tank that steadfastly refuses to move.

Kelly’s Heroes features a top-notch ensemble cast. Of course there’s Eastwood – he plays his role fairly straight. Kelly is resourceful and brave, but he has been busted back from lieutenant to private for a mistake that was not his fault. Basically, he is now at war with the system. Eastwood didn’t carry, Where Eagles Dare (Burton was the star) but here, the film falls solely on his shoulders. Thankfully he is helped out by Savalas, who also plays it straight and tough. But you need straight guys to play opposite Donald Sutherland. Sutherland plays one of the weirdest characters to populate a World War II drama. Oddball is a sixties style hippy…and sure he maybe out of place in 1944, but his scenes are hilarious. Then you’ve got Don Rickles (for the youngsters reading this – Mr. Potato Head). Rickles is Rickles. He doesn’t really change. And Harry Dean Stanton has a small early role (cos a repo-man spends his life getting into tense situations).

The music by Lalo Schifrin is good (did you expect anything else?) but it doesn’t have the rhythmic hooks that some of his other scores do. It often falls back on staccato military drum beats, which I ‘think’ are intended to evoke Ron Goodwin’s score from Where Eagles Dare. For the showdown at the end of the movie, the score even veers into mock Morricone territory, harking back to Eastwood’s Dollars trilogy. The title song, ‘Burning Bridges’, by the Mike Curb Congregation is pleasant enough piece of early 70’s bubblegum pop, but it is not particularly memorable outside this film.

‘Burning Bridges’, by the Mike Curb Congregation uploaded by 5tealthh

Although Kelly’s Heroes is directed by Brian G. Hutton, the man behind Where Eagles Dare, the two films are very different. Where Eagles Dare is a rip-roaring adventure film, but Kelly’s Heores combines two genres – the War film and the Caper film. The idea almost works, but it does result in a little un-eveness. Sometimes the film is a very serious war drama, and shows the consequences of death in a war zone. This is amplified by the fact that Kelly’s platoon choose to go after the gold at their own personal risk. Then right beside these poignant scenes, they’ll insert Carroll O’Connor’s ham fisted cartoon antics. It doesn’t always gel. But overall, I believe that Kelly’s Heroes is a fine, and extremely entertaining film.

Kelly’s Heroes (1970)

Kelly's Heroes (1970)

Director: Brian G. Hutton
Starring: Clint Eastwood, Telly Savalas, Donald Sutherland, Don Rickles, Carroll O’Connor, Gavin MacLeod, Stuart Margolin, Jeff Morris, Harry Dean Stanton, Gene Collins, Perry Lopez, Hal Buckley, Karl-Otto Alberty
Music: Lalo Schifrin

After Where Eagles Dare, Clint Eastwood had starred in two flop movies. First there was Paint Your Wagon, which was one of the failures that nearly forced Paramount pictures into bankruptcy. Then he followed it up with Two Mules For Sister Sara, which again, wasn’t quite the success that he had hoped. Naturally, he looked at making another Where Eagles Dare to get punters bums back on seats. The result was Kelly’s Heroes. But Kelly’s Heroes is a bit different – it isn’t another blood and guts, shoot ‘em up, – it’s a caper film.

The film opens during the middle of a battle. Mortar shells are raining down and buildings are exploding. Behind enemy lines, Private Kelly (Clint Eastwood) has captured himself a German Intelligence Officer. He brings him back for interrogation. Inside the German’s attaché case, Kelly finds two lead bars. When questioned, the German says if he was captured he was to throw the case in a river. The lead weights were to weigh it down. Then Kelly notices that a bit of lead has been scraped away at the bottom of one of the bars. It looks like the lead coating is to disguise the gold bar underneath. Kelly starts plying the Officer with brandy to find out more.

Trailer uploaded to Youtube by: Weduc79

The liquor eventually loosens the Officer’s tongue, and he reveals that 14,000 gold bars have been placed in a bank in the town of Claremont. Claremont is 20 miles behind enemy lines, and the town (and bank) are guarded by three Tiger Tanks.

But Kelly thinks that he has been getting shot at, mortared and bombed on for virtually no reward at all. Why not make a little extra out of it? He decides to go after the gold. Luckily, his platoon, which is under the leadership of Big Joe (Telly Savalas) has just been relieved of duties on the front line, and has three days rest. Kelly convinces them all, that they should risk their lives, behind enemy lines to rob the bank.

But Kelly needs a little bit of help from a few outsiders. The first is Crapgame (Don Rickles). Crapgame is the supply officer. Through him, Kelly arranges all the weapons, ammunition and supplies he needs for the incursion. To go up against the three Tiger tanks in Claremont, Kelly enlists the aid of a misfit named Oddball (Donald Sutherland), who is in command of three Sherman tanks. With the motley crew assembled, the men head off into the warzone, each expecting a share in a $16,000,000 payday. Of course, it isn’t all beer and skittles, and the platoon has to face quite a few hardships before reaching their objective.

The film has a great ending too. When our squad of men have reached the bank in Claremont, and overcome nearly all obstacles, there is one last little hiccup. Parked in front of the bank is a Tiger tank that steadfastly refuses to move.

Kelly’s Heroes features a top-notch ensemble cast. Of course there’s Eastwood – he plays his role fairly straight. Kelly is resourceful and brave, but he has been busted back from lieutenant to private for a mistake that was not his fault. Basically, he is now at war with the system. Eastwood didn’t carry, Where Eagles Dare (Burton was the star) but here, the film falls solely on his shoulders. Thankfully he is helped out by Savalas, who also plays it straight and tough. But you need straight guys to play opposite Donald Sutherland. Sutherland plays one of the weirdest characters to populate a World War II drama. Oddball is a sixties style hippy…and sure he maybe out of place in 1944, but his scenes are hilarious. Then you’ve got Don Rickles (for the youngsters reading this – Mr. Potato Head). Rickles is Rickles. He doesn’t really change. And Harry Dean Stanton has a small early role (cos a repo-man spends his life getting into tense situations).

The music by Lalo Schifrin is good (did you expect anything else?) but it doesn’t have the rhythmic hooks that some of his other scores do. It often falls back on staccato military drum beats, which I ‘think’ are intended to evoke Ron Goodwin’s score from Where Eagles Dare. For the showdown at the end of the movie, the score even veers into mock Morricone territory, harking back to Eastwood’s Dollars trilogy. The title song, ‘Burning Bridges’, by the Mike Curb Congregation is pleasant enough piece of early 70’s bubblegum pop, but it is not particularly memorable outside this film.

‘Burning Bridges’, by the Mike Curb Congregation uploaded by 5tealthh

Although Kelly’s Heroes is directed by Brian G. Hutton, the man behind Where Eagles Dare, the two films are very different. Where Eagles Dare is a rip-roaring adventure film, but Kelly’s Heores combines two genres – the War film and the Caper film. The idea almost works, but it does result in a little un-eveness. Sometimes the film is a very serious war drama, and shows the consequences of death in a war zone. This is amplified by the fact that Kelly’s platoon choose to go after the gold at their own personal risk. Then right beside these poignant scenes, they’ll insert Carroll O’Connor’s ham fisted cartoon antics. It doesn’t always gel. But overall, I believe that Kelly’s Heroes is a fine, and extremely entertaining film.

Kelly's Heroes (1970)

Blofeld sings…

Well not really. It’s Telly Savalas singing – (although they are more spoken word vocals). If you’re interested in what an evil mastermind sounds like in the recording studio, then here’s your chance to find out, thanks to MP3 MIX by JENSONBRASIL.

To download the album, click here.

Although I don’t know if you’re going to thank me for this link…his version of ‘You’ve lost that lovin’ feeling’ makes me cry for all the wrong reasons.

Who loves ya, baby!

Blofeld sings…

The Karate Killers (1967)

AKA: The Five Daughters Affair
Country:
United States
Director: Barry Shear

Starring: Robert Vaughn, David McCallum, Herbert Lom, Curt Jurgens, Telly Savalas, Jill Ireland, Terry-Thomas, Kim Darby, Diane McBain, Leo G. Carroll, Danielle De Metz

Music: Gerald Fried
The Man From UNCLE theme by Jerry Goldsmith

There are many reasons why this film could be regarded as the worst of The Man From UNCLE films – because of the way the story is structured, it is repetitive and episodic, rather than a fluid and cohesive piece of cinema. Having said that, and throwing away all the rulebooks, this movie has to be my favourite in the series. It’s an absolute hoot.

The film opens with – not one, but three autogyros flying over head – autogyros? Think ‘Little Nellie’ from You Only Live Twice. Down below on a winding mountain road in a sporty blue car are Napoleon Solo (Robert Vaughn) and illya Kuryakin (David McCallum). From above the autogyros start peppering our intrepid UNCLE agents with rockets. Due to there choice of car, it appears that the UNCLE boys can’t just roll down the windows and shoot back, they have to open the doors, and these are top opening doors, so Napoleon’s view of his overhead attackers is impeded. So how do they get out of this tricky situation? Illya drives the car into a tunnel. That’s it! I guess they waited the for the autogyros to run low on petrol and go home.

Now as you have no doubt guessed, the guys in the autogyros were THRUSH agents and they were trying to stop Illya and Napoleon from visiting Dr. Simon True who is a scientist who has been working on a vital desalinisation project. During the experiment, as Napoleon and Illya watch, Professor True has a heart attack. Just before he dies, he whispers that his ‘formula’ for the experiment has been passed to the ‘four winds’.

Meanwhile, Professor True’s widow, Amanda (Joan Crawford) is being consoled by her lover, Randolph (Herbert Lom). But Randolph’s care and affection only stretches so far when he can’t find a copy of the Professor’s formula – as that is all he was after. He only had an affair with Amanda so he could get the formula. He questions her and she refuses to co-operate. This is where Randolph starts getting rough – he calls in a band of THRUSH agents in red skivvies with black leather vests and gloves. These guys are the ‘Karate Killers’ from the title and they tear the place a part, and kill Amanda.

The men from UNCLE turn up too late with the Professor’s youngest daughter, Sandra True (Kim Darby). She surmises that the ‘four winds’ that the formula has been scattered to, are in fact Professor True’s four errant step daughters. The first of these daughters, Margo (Diane McBain) is now living in Italy – married to Count Valeriano De Fanzini (Telly Savalas). The Count is an unstable and jealous man and keeps Margo locked up, naked, in an attic. When Napoleon and Illya turn up with Sandra in tow, they don’t quite receive the welcome they expected. The situation gets worse when Randolph turns up the his squad of Karate Killers.

After a slap stick fight sequence, Margo gives the men from UNCLE a photo that her step father had sent to her. In the background of the photo, on a chalk board is part of a formula. On it’s own it doesn’t mean too much, but all of the step daughters have a piece of the formula, and once they have all the pieces they can work out Professor True’s plan for desalinisation.

The next daughter, Imogene (Jill Ireland) is in London, and all parties head across to the UK for the next part of the story. When we first meet Imogene, she has just been arrested – by Terry-Thomas – for indecent exposure. Of course Randolph turns up.

After that we head to the Swiss Alps and the Daughter is Yvonne (Danielle De Metz). She is entangled in a relationship with wealthy gigolo, Carl Von Kesser (Curt Jurgens). And once again Randolph turns up. As I mentioned at the opening, the story is rather repetitive, with our men from UNCLE traipsing across the globe tracking down one step daughter after another – and always Randolph and his cronies are on hand to throw a spanner in the works. But the repetition is not really a hurdle because each episode is fun, and has a great cast.

It’s probably not logical, but I rate this Man From UNCLE movie pretty highly. It is perfect lightweight spy entertainment with plenty of cliff hanger moments, which the boys have to extricate themselves from. This is also one of the more tongue-in-cheek movies of the series. The Man From UNCLE always had a healthy does of comedy thrown into the mix, but this is just swinging sixties excess at its best!

The Karate Killers (1967)